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Course Descriptions Fall 2016

 Fall 2016 Course Descriptions

Course descriptions are presented in alphabetical order by Course Leader (CL) last name.

Course Day and Time:  To find out when a course is being given, go to Course Schedule here, or at the end of any course description.

List of course leaders and course titles: For the list (2 pages), click here.

Course codes also contain the day and time information:

  • Tue, Wed, Thu designate the day the course is given (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday);
  • In the middle field, 1, 2 or 3 stand for the period in which the course is given on that day;
  • In the rightmost field, 10 and 5 stand for the course length in weeks; 5a or 5b means that the course is given in the first or second half of the semester, respectively;
Printable file of the Course Schedule and Course Descriptions (26 pages): click here or go to the bottom of this page for the file to print or view.

 In the table below, click on the CL name to go to the course description:

 Course Code
 Course Leader
 Course Title
Wed-1B-5a
Marty Agulnek
Conversations from the New Yorker: (Non-Fiction) Discussion of contemporary and/or controversial topics
Thu-1A-10
Suzanne Art
From Frou Frou to Heroic: Painting in 18th and early 19th Century France
Wed-2B-10 Robert Berlin
Climate Change:  Where Do You Stand?  What Can You Do?
Tue-2B-10
MaryAnn Byrnes
Language Talks (Not being given)
Wed-1C-5b
Elizabeth Cabot
A Taste of Virginia Woolf
Thu-3B-5b
Magdaline (Dena) Caradimitropoulo
Topics in Nutrition Science
Tue-2E-5b
Elizabeth David
I'm Out of Here! Conversations About Transitions, Changes, Endings and New Beginnings
Thu-2C-10
Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan
Sisters in Crime: Women Mystery Writers 1880 to the Present
Thu-3A-10
Margot Holtzman
Corel Painter Essentials; Painting Your Photo
Thu-1C-10
Joel Kamer
Short Stories with a Dash of Math
Thu-2B-5b
Arnold Kerzner
Everything You Wanted to Know About Your Brain, but Couldn't Remember to Ask
Wed-2C-5a
Barbara Koren
Understanding and Supporting the Child with Special Needs (Not being given)
Wed-3A-10
Bonnie Lass
The New Yorker Fiction Roundtable
Wed-1D-10
Michael Levy
The Korean War: “The Forgotten War”
Tue-1B-10
Mary Mansfield and Richard Mansfield
The American Dream in Crisis
Thu-3D-10
Richard Mansfield and Marty Nichols
Hard Times: Contemporary Challenges II
Wed-3B-10
Carole McNamee
Writing a Memoir: One Story at a Time
Thu-3C-5b
Lois Novotny
Shakespeare, Opera and Ballet: Transforming One Art Form into Another
Tue-2A-10
Rabbi Robert Orkand
The Book of Genesis
Tue-2C-10
Alorie Parkhill
A Journey into Feminism Through History and Literature
Thu-2A-5a
Judith Pinnolis
5 Easy Pieces: A History of Klezmer Music from the Middle Ages to the Present
Tue-1C-10
David Rosen
History, Mysteries and Masters of Glass
Tue-2D-5a
Peter Schmidt
The Humanity of Heinrich Böll: Selected Short Stories
Tue-1D-10
Carol Shedd
The New Testament: What's it all About?
Thu-2D-5b
Sandy Sherizen
Selected Topics in Crime, Punishment and Prevention
Wed-1A-10
Irwin Silver
Films About Sports
Thu-2E-10
Marvin Snider
George Washington - A Reluctant & Indispensable President
Tue-1A-10 Harriet Janel Starrett
The Evolution of the Modern Middle East
Wed-2D-5b
Judie Strauss
LILAC Players
Wed-3C-5a
Joanne Tuck
Reconstruction (1865-1877): Its Legacy in Our Time
Thu-1B-10
Lois Ziegelman
Gods and Broads: Four Ancient Greek Plays (Not being given)


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Wed-1B-5aConversations from The New Yorker (Non-Fiction): Contemporary and/or controversial topics.

Course Leader:  Martin Agulnek

Course length/Start:  5-week course starting Sept. 14 (first half)

Course Description: 

The New Yorker magazine is known for the quality and depth of reporting on critical and timely issues. Thought-provoking articles are selected for the class to read in advance which will focus on topics such as health, politics, technology, law etc. After a brief introduction that addresses the author’s background and the timeliness of the article, the class will provide a forum for lively discussion reflecting their own views and knowledge of the subject. Video and other visuals will also be used to enhance the class experience. The article and topics for discussion are provided in advance of each session. Access to The New Yorker magazine historical archives are also available – class suggestions are welcome. Those from 1925 onwards will allow us to examine topics through a 2016 lens. We may include such an example. Class members should be able to download articles that will be sent as an e-mail attachment in PDF (or Word) format to be printed. Articles can also be read directly on your electronic device. Homework should take approximately one to two hours.

Biography:

Martin received a Doctor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Washington University (St Louis, Missouri). During that time he was involved with early computing that became the precursors to the technology we have today. Martin has worked for Sperry Gyroscope-Univac, Xerox, Texas Instruments, Polaroid and Thomson Reuters in various engineering and management capacities and has both witnessed and has been a contributor to the technological changes that has occurred during these past 50 years. Martin began piano lessons as an adult learner (without any prior musical knowledge) several years ago and continues to take lessons (and practice). He is an avid reader of magazine journalism.


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Thu-1A-10From Frou Frou to Heroic: Painting in 18th and early 19th Century France

Course Leader:  Suzanne Art

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

After the death of Louis XIV in 1715, the fun-loving Duke of Orleans ruled as regent for his 5-year-old nephew, and France turned away from imperial aspirations to focus on more personal — and pleasurable – pursuits. This change led to a new style in art, known as the Rococo, which was highly decorative, playful, and often erotic. Jean-Antoine Watteau established the new style with his fetes galantes – paintings of fine ladies and gentlemen in silks and satins frolicking in an idealized natural setting. Boucher and Fragonard depicted classical divinities and well-dressed French shepherdesses in romantic pastoral landscapes.  On the earthier side, Chardin and Greuze painted domestic scenes of the struggling lower classes. As protests escalated against the monarchy by mid-century, social critics cried out for a more morally uplifting type of art. The new Neoclassical style, epitomized in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, paid tribute to Roman republican virtues and helped fuel the French revolutionary fervor. The wars of the Revolution and of the Napoleonic era ushered in the Romantic style, which presented nature as an uncontrollable and unpredictable power, very much at odds with the orderly landscapes of earlier painters. Major Romantic artists were Gericault and Delacroix, whose dramatic history paintings bore a striking political message.

Through an in-depth study of the paintings of these three movements in France, we will learn about the evolution of artistic technique and style as well as the fascinating and often turbulent times that the paintings reflect. There will be a balance of background lectures by the CL and group discussions of individual paintings. All assignments will be online; these include short biographies and historical overviews as well as videos of art historians discussing specific paintings and periods of French history.

Biography:

I have always loved art and history. I have a BA in History, an MA in the French Language and Literature, and an MA in Teaching. I taught history for 16 years at a private school. During that time, I also wrote a series of twelve history books, a major feature of which is the study of the art of a given culture. I have taught three art courses at LLAIC: Painters of the Italian Renaissance, Three Giants of the Northern Renaissance, and Let’s Go for Baroque.


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Wed-2B-10Climate Change:  Where Do You Stand?  What Can You Do?

Course Leader:  Robert Berlin

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 14

Course Description: 

Do you agree with Nobel Prize winner Desmond Tutu that there is no greater environmental threat to humanity’s future than the impact of a changing climate? He sums up this threat: “Destruction of the earth’s environment is the biggest human rights challenge today.” Or do you believe, as does Ted Cruz, that climate change is “the perfect pseudoscientific theory for a power-hungry politician?” Or something else? This course will explore all aspects of the issue, first clarifying the difference between “climate” and “weather” and examining the evidence of worldwide climate variations from their historical patterns. We will discuss these variations, especially those that are attributable to human activity, with an emphasis on the production and burning of fossil fuels. We will focus on what is being done now and what can be done in the future to minimize the effects of climate change. We’ll explore the complex politics and economics of the issue, form personal choices (What car should I buy?) to international agreements (i.e. The Paris Accords). What are the political and economic realities of reduced emissions, conversions to other energy sources (i.e. renewable, nuclear, hydroelectric, fracked gas)? Abatement actions to counter the increasing impacts of climate extremes will also be discussed. The class format will combine presentation and the lively discussion that comes from strong opinions about climate change. Assignments will be about one hour of readings per week from Internet sites. Prior technical knowledge is not required.

Biography:

I was trained originally as an engineer, and employed in the development of advanced energy systems. My work became environmentally-oriented after I obtained a doctorate in Public Health. I worked in the environmental and energy fields for over 50 years, both in the private and government sectors. I taught environmental and engineering courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels and to industrial and lay audiences. I am a licensed professional engineer, reactor operator, and health physicist and coauthored "Radioactive Waste Management" in 1988.


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Tue-2B-10:  Language Talks

Course Leader:  MaryAnn Byrnes

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

Language – the system of symbols used to communicate thoughts and events.  Most babies learn language in 12 short months; adults take years to master a second language.  Although we use language incessantly, we seldom talk about its many aspects and controversies – and there is so much to consider.  Each week of this course will focus on a specific language topic, including the following:  Is language the spark of humanity – the essence of what makes us human?  How do words develop – and disappear?  How do texting, slang and dialect affect “standard” English?  What are the differences (if any) between politically correct speech and political speech?  And does all this talk about language neglect the power of silence and quiet? To introduce the topic of the week, and stimulate discussion, preparation will include text readings and presentations from TED Talks (www.ted.com), an online compendium of intriguing ideas. Members will need the ability to watch online presentations in advance. Expect highly interactive class sessions, devoted to discussing various perspectives on the week’s topic.  Class sessions will be exploration of the weekly question, primarily through active discussion.  “Homework” TED talks may be analyzed in part; other videos may be used in class. Students will need to access the TED links I provide them.  Also, I will send handouts and links from each week’s PowerPoint presentation for student reference. Homework should be approximately one to two hours.

Books and other resources:

The 5-Minute Linguist: Bite-sized Essays on Language and Languages. E. M. Rickerson & B. Hilton (Eds). 
Online videos will also be assigned.

Biography:

MaryAnn Byrnes’ undergraduate (University of Chicago) and graduate degrees (Northwestern, Rutgers) all emphasized variations in human language and learning. As a teacher, special education administrator, educational consultant, and UMass Boston faculty member, MaryAnn had the pleasure of collaborating with others about hundreds of learners and a multitude of communication styles. In addition to Lifelong Learning, she enjoys baking bread, walking (perhaps because of the energy of the bread), and reading for Learning Ally (previously known as Reading for the Blind). This is MaryAnn’s fifth year relishing the language-rich communities of lifelong learning institutes.


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Wed-1C-5bA Taste of Virginia Woolf 

Course Leader:  Elizabeth Cabot

Course length/Start5-week course starting Oct. 26 (second half)

Course Description: 

We will study one of Virginia Woolf's best-known novels, Mrs. Dalloway, and see the film version. This novel was a breakthrough in Woolf's style and is noted for its unity around the varied motifs of its time (1920s London). We'll begin with a short story which became the genesis of the longer work, and some excerpts from her diaries. In those writings, we can see her developing a new theory of characterization, which becomes the interior monologue we see to a greater extent in the works of James Joyce, and which established Woolf as a major novelist of the early twentieth century. In addition, we'll see the movie version of "The Hours,” an adaptation of Mrs. Dalloway, by Michael Cunningham, a contemporary British novelist. His book, and the film, broaden the scope of Woolf's novel by including three different stories and time periods and set before us some provocative parallels and contrasts.

Books and other resources: 

Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf. Amazon carries a paperback version copyrighted in 1981 by Maureen Howard.
ISBN: 0-1-662870-8

Biography:

I taught English literature and composition for 20+ years at U Mass Boston and Boston University, where I got my Ph.D. in English. My specialization was early 20th century literature; my dissertation topic was Woolf's use of painting in her novels. Then I began teaching English as a Second or Other Language to adults in the workplace (mainly biotech companies) and community education programs in Newton and Weston, which I've been doing for another 20 years. I also do private tutoring and teach a 5-session workshop training volunteers for one-on-one tutoring with ELL learners. Though I love the latter, I'm happy to get back to literature again, especially my favorite author.


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Thu-3B-5bTopics in Nutrition Science

Course Leader:  Dena Caradimitropoulo

Course length/Start5-week course starting Oct. 27 (second half)

Course Description: 

The goal of the class is to help us evaluate the diet and health information we receive from the popular media and to sort through the confusion caused by mixed nutrition messages.  Our class will analyze and discuss current and relevant topics in nutrition science.  For homework, we will read journal articles, evaluate government online resources, read excerpts from books, listen to podcasts, or watch videos to help us understand the material and to arm us for our discussions.  Each class will feature a short presentation followed by a class discussion.  Topics include:  Are there differences in the nutrition needs for women and men?  Why do I crave sugar, alcohol, or salty snacks?  Do I really have to eat kale every day? Homework should be two hours at most.

Books and other resources: 
  • Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 2013, Gropper and Smith
  • Mark’s Basic Medical Biochemistry, 2013, Lieberman and Marks
  • Wardlaw’s Perspectives in Nutrition, 2013, Kelly et al.
Biography:

Dena Caradimitropoulo is a graduate candidate for her Masters of Nutrition Science and Policy at the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition.  She is a licensed nutrition and wellness counselor who graduated from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition in NYC.  She is a Food Over Medicine and Women’s Health certified instructor from the Wellness Forum and is also a Juice Plus+ educator.  Dena is passionate about teaching individuals and families that “food is thy medicine” and that they can take charge of their health through informed nutritional choices.  Dena has a BS in Chemistry from the United States Military Academy at West Point and an MBA from Harvard Business School.


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Tue-2E-5b:   I’m Out of Here! Conversations About Transitions, Changes, Endings and New Beginnings

Course Leader:  Elizabeth David

Course length/Start5-week course starting Nov. 1 (second half)

Course Description: 

We all have opportunities for small and large goodbyes, leave-takings, endings and exits. Some include ceremony, some are life passages, some are small and some rock our worlds. Some may go unnoticed and underappreciated. How we navigate these transitions often determines whether or not we move on in peace or are troubled. We will be discussing real life stories, narratives including a gay man exiting the closet, a sixteen-year-old boy who is forced to leave Iran, a Catholic priest who leaves the church, an anthropologist who leaves the field, an executive leaving a leadership role after twenty-five years, a chief attending physician in an intensive care unit guiding patients and families toward accepting the final exit – all these and more.  This course is a discussion group based on the book Exit:The Endings That Set Us Free, by Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, a MacArthur prize-winning sociologist and Professor of Education at Harvard University.  Each week we will discuss the narratives of interviews conducted by the author and use them as inspiration for contemplating our own stories of endings and beginnings.  Assignments will include topics for reflection for each section and should require about an hour, depending on reading rates.

Books and other resources: 

Exit: The Endings That Set Us Free by Sara Lawrence Lightfoot Copyright 2012. A paperback edition is available

Biography:

Elizabeth David has a Masters Degree from Lesley College in Expressive Therapies and has been offering courses and workshops, primarily, about dealing with change and ageing for many years including at the Brandeis Lifelong Learning Program for about 13 years. Professionally she was a Hospice Bereavement Coordinator where she followed and counseled families for a year following the death of the patient and, subsequently, Director of Volunteers, where she trained and supervised volunteers who interacted with the patient and family.  She has a family of five children, seven grandchildren and husband Barry, the love of her life.


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Thu-2C-10Sisters in Crime: Women Mystery Writers 1880 to the Present

Course Leaders:  Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

If you can’t resist a good mystery novel, you’re in good company. W.H. Auden is quoted as saying:

For me, as for many others, the reading of detective stories is an addiction like tobacco or alcohol. The symptoms of this are: firstly, the intensity of the craving – if I have any work to do, I must be careful not to get hold of a detective story for, once I begin one, I cannot work or sleep till I have finished it. Secondly, its specificity – the story must conform to certain formulas. . . And thirdly, its immediacy.

From Agatha Christie to P.D. James, Peter Wimsey to Kinsey Milhone, classic to cozy, there’s a mystery to suit every taste, and women writers have been equal players in the murder and mayhem genre from the beginning. This course will make a historical-social-political survey of the women mystery writers, their sleuths and styles, as they evolved over time. We will explore various sub-genres, the uniquely female perspective (if there is one!) and share our own preferences and favorites. The course will feature background lectures, guided group discussion, and occasional video clips (primarily author interviews). Participants will be encouraged, but not required, to provide brief reports – “endorsements” – of favorite authors. Ability to print out pdfs or word documents is necessary.  We will be communicating via email with class members and will occasionally send a link to an online document or website. Most weeks, students will be expected to read a mystery of approximately 300 pages.

Books and other resources: 

Week 1 – The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Week 2 - The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey
Week 3 – Laura by Vera Caspary
Week 4 – The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
Week 5 – Simisola by Ruth Rendell
Week 6 – A Is for Alibi by Sue Grafton
Week 7 – Postmortem by Patricia Cornwell
Week 8 – Still Life by Louise Penny
Week 9 – Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death by M.C. Beaton
Week 10 – Bedford Square by Anne Perry

Biography:

Sandy Grasfield has been reading mysteries for decades and finally stopped hiding them at the bottom of the pile of books she was borrowing when an observant librarian, who noticed she was embarrassed, told her that both Winston Churchill and John F. Kennedy read them too. She has led courses at LLAIC and elsewhere on this and other subjects.

Dana Kaplan has been an avid reader of many types of mysteries, starting with Nancy Drew. When her classmates became boy crazy, she remained (and still is) book crazy. Her business career as a marketing team leader included creating and conducting many interactive staff training programs.

They led this same class in the spring 2016 semester.


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Thu-3A-10Corel Painter Essentials; Painting Your Photos

Course Leader:  Margot Holtzman

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

You can push a button and your photo will magically turn into a painting, or you can spend hours artistically improving your photo. This course will teach the fundamentals of painting a photo, you will master the tools involved and practice with the exciting brushes. You do NOT need to be a painter of any kind but only have a desire to explore digital painting and enjoy the creativity of learning this exciting software program. It is easy to create art at any skill level. You will work on projects either using your own photos, or those supplied by the instructor. You must bring your own laptop for this course and purchase the software (approximately $35) and a tablet/stylus (approximately $65). One can purchase both for $99.95 (as of this writing):
Wacom Intuos Art Pen and Touch digital graphics, drawing & painting tablet: New Version (CTH490AB)

You only need to know basic computer use … how to save a file and how to find it again. Corel Painter Essentials works on both a Mac and a PC. You can download a trial version and use it free for one month at Painterartist free trials. The only homework will be watching videos of how the program is used by others and practicing what was covered in class. The more practicing one does at home, the more you will retain. Warning … this program is addictive.

Books and other resources: 

Prior to the first class, I will send students a pdf of the “Quick Start Guide” to this program. There are many books on this subject. None are needed for this class; most are written for the “heavy duty” program, not the lite version we will be working on. I will bring in some books for students to browse for ideas.

Biography:

I was introduced to Corel Painter when taking a Photoshop class at UMASS. Since then I have taken several on-line courses on the “heavy-duty” version of this program. The “lite” version is a stripped-down version of the original. I am not an artist, but have created satisfying paintings of my photos, some of which I have printed and framed. This has become a satisfying hobby and has given me a drive to photograph vistas to paint.

Corel offers a free trial of this program which anyone can download and use for 30 days. The free trial will not last the 10-week class. But you can try before you buy – here’s how to get it: http://www.painterartist.com/us/product/photo-effects/ (click on “download trial”). It will work with a mouse and without a stylus, but it will be like “painting with a bar of soap.”


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Thu-1C-10Short Stories with a Dash of Math

Course Leader:  Joel Kamer

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

We will be reading an eclectic group of short stories, all of which have a flavor of math in them (though sometimes tenuously!). The authors cover a wide spectrum and include Jonathan Swift (“Cycloid“), Aldous Huxley (“Young Archimedes”), Jorge Luis Borges (“The Library of Babel”), John Cheever (“The Geometry of Love”), O. Henry (“The Chair of Philanthro-mathematics”), Arthur Koestler (“Pythagoras and the Psychoanalyst”), Karel Capek ("The Death of Archimedes”), Rebecca Goldstein (“The Geometry of Soap Bubbles”), Arthur C. Clarke (“The Nine Billion Names of God”), and others.  The stories range from serious to philosophical to whimsical to fun. We’ll discuss the stories in depth and, on occasion, the CL will expound on the math referenced therein. I expect to be able to print all of the stories for the class members so they won’t have to access the internet for any of them. Assignments will take approximately two hours.

Biography:

I learned reading at an early age and then, after ‘riting, I learned ‘rithmetic.  I found ‘rithmetic so enthralling that I went on to eventually receive a master’s degree in mathematics and another in actuarial science. I became a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries, and put some of this learning to use. In my spare time I’ve tried to maintain my reading skills, in particular by reading fiction.  Over the years I’ve read novels and short stories that indulged my love of mathematics. In this course I’ll be sharing my favorite short stories of this genre that I’ve read over the years.


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Thu-2B-5bEverything You Wanted to Know About Your Brain, But Couldn’t Remember to Ask

Course Leader:  Arnold Kerzner

Course length/Start5-week course starting one week late on Nov. 3 and ending Dec. 8 in makeup week (second half)

Course Description: 

This course will describe the major aspects of the development of the human brain: how it is stimulated by both nurture and genetics, how it is capable of multitasking, how the brain is different from the mind and how it has the capacity to remember the past while forgetting where you parked your car.  We will focus on the flexibility and resilience of the brain and how it is built for healing itself after various setbacks such as ADHD, depression, anxiety and strokes. Our goal will be to share the latest research and clinical evidence so that we may appreciate the many ways that we can keep our brains alive and well long enough to discover personal wisdom.The course will be presented in an interactive manner with a combination of lectures, personal anecdotes, and clinical vignettes accompanied by PowerPoint slides and discussion of selected readings. Questions and comments will be encouraged. Assignments should take approximately two hours.

Books and other resources: 
  • The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science by Norman Doidge Dec. 18, 2007   ISBN 978-0-14-311310-2  Paperback new $11.50, used $5 on Amazon
  • The Brain’s Way of  Healing by Norman Doidge, MD  Penguin Jan. 26, 2016  ISBN 13: 978-0143128373
Biography:

I am a physician, board certified in pediatrics and psychiatry-neurology, and have practiced family and community psychiatry for 45 years. During my career I have been founder of The Boston Institute for the Development of Infants and Parents, the clinical director of The Human Relations Center of Wellesley, the psychiatrist at The Perkins School for the Blind, and am currently the psychiatric consultant to the Lighthouse School. I have enjoyed presenting medical topics to “Learning in Retirement” groups and learning about the functioning of their brains by way of their questions and repartee. My clinical practice and research interests have led to my fascination with how the mind is such an amazing part of who and why we are what we are. I led this course in the spring term this year but was unable to accommodate all the members that wanted to register for it, and so I am offering it again.


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Wed-2C-5aUnderstanding and Supporting the Child with Special Needs

Course Leader:  Barbara Koren

Course length/Start5-week course starting Sept. 14 (first half)

Course Description: 

The overall goal of this course is to help family members and family friends better understand the nature of different learning disorders. In addition to reviewing current information about the nature of various disabilities/learning disorders, we will discuss practical strategies that can enhance relationships and interactions and support the child’s growth. Class members will be encouraged, though certainly not pressured, to share their personal experiences. Respect for confidentiality and a spirit of mutual support are essential. Assignments should be approximately one hour.

Books and other resources: 

I will be sending students PDFs from various texts including the following:
  • The Activity Kit for Babies and Toddlers at Risk, Deborah Fein, Molly Helt, Lynn Brennan and Marianne Barton. The Guilford Press. 2016
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder: What Every Parent Needs to Know, Alan Rosenblatt and Paul Carbone.  American Academy of Pediatrics. 2013
  • Smart But Scattered, Peg Dawson and Richard Guare. The Guilford Press. 2009
  • Inside Asperger’s Looking Out, Kathy Hoopmann. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 2013
  • The Child With Special Needs: Encouraging Intellectual and Emotional Growth, Stanley Greenspan. Perseus Books. 1998
  • The Out-of-Sync Child, Carol Kranowitz. The Berkley Publishing Group. 2005.
Biography:

I have worked in the field of Special Education since 1971. My graduate studies are in the fields of Reading, Learning Disabilities and Special Education administration. After working as a Reading Teacher and Learning Disabilities Specialist in elementary and secondary schools, I served as a Special Education administrator for school districts in Beverly, Wellesley, Weston and Bedford. Since retiring from my position as Director of Special Education for the Bedford Public Schools in 2005, I have supervised student teachers for Simmons College and taught graduate special education courses for Lesley and Framingham State Universities. I look forward to teaching my first course for LLAIC this coming Fall 2016. 


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Wed-3A-10The New Yorker Fiction Round Table

Course Leader:  Bonnie Lass

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 14

Course Description: 

Through presentation and discussion, we will explore two related short stories at our sessions, 18 stories in all for nine classes (In the first class we will introduce ourselves, discuss class procedures, the syllabus, and literary terms.). The stories will be entirely from The New Yorker, and will be, with one exception, from a 2016 issue. The relationship between the two stories may be their author, theme, style, structure, literary devices, or inspiration. I'll make copies of the stories available either by xerox copy or digitally. With the Roundtable, the hope is that, as with the goals of: 1. our Collaborative, 2. King Arthur and his knights, and 3. Dorothy Parker and the literary wits at the Algonquin, everyone will have an important role!  But choice is key. Participants may opt to 1) lead a session by preparing a Reader's Guide for that week's stories and leading the discussion, 2) partner as leaders or 3) just take part. I suspect we'll have a great time!

Biography:

I retired in 2012 from a career in the language arts (teaching from first grade to graduate school and educational publishing). During the Fall 2014 term at LLAIC, I was the course leader for Contemporary Literary Memoir, and in the Spring 2015 and Fall 2015 terms, I was course leader for The Blues. Now, inspired by the New Yorker Group at BOLLI, courses at LLAIC led by Gene Kupferschmid and Helen Kolsky, and my lifelong passion for short fiction from Poe to Munro, I'll be leading The New Yorker Fiction Roundtable for Fall 2016.


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Wed-1D-10The Korean War: “The Forgotten War”

Course Leader:  Michael Levy

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 14

Course Description: 

This course is based on The Coldest Winter, David Halberstam’s last book. The study group will explore the geopolitical and historical origins and the consequences of the Korean War and how it influenced American foreign policy. While the war has been labeled “The Forgotten War,” it was the first limited war and has influenced the conduct of all U.S. conflicts since then. Halberstam commands a panoramic and historical group of participants ranging from Taft and Teddy Roosevelt through Chiang Kai-shek, Truman, MacArthur, Acheson, Joe McCarthy, Henry Luce and Eisenhower. He illustrates tragically and clearly the difference between the reality of war to the commanders and to the soldiers fighting at the front. The problems of political and military leadership that surfaced during the Korean War presage the arguments we hear today about Afghanistan, Iraq, and Iran. The study group will utilize articles and readings from the internet to facilitate discussion in the course. Information will be sent by email. Readings should take approximately an hour.

Books: 

The Coldest Winter, David Halberstam (Hyperion 2007 1st edition). ISBN 978-1-4013-0052-4     

Biography:

Shortly after graduation with a BS from the College of William & Mary in 1951, Michael enlisted in the Navy, and served for three and half years as an officer on a destroyer. During that time, he saw combat in the Korean War earning two battle stars and circumnavigating the globe.

After discharge from the service, Michael spent more than forty years in a variety of senior management positions in engineering, finance, and manufacturing. Included was work designing guidance system components for the Apollo moon shots. Most recently he retired as chairman of ProfitLogic, a company he founded in 1984, which pioneered the application of sophisticated computer optimization analysis to the management of the inventory of large retail chain stores. The company was sold in 2006 to Oracle Corporation. Michael has spent some years as an elected member of the Wayland School Committee, including stints as chairman. It was an occupation that taught him humility and the limitations of power. He has also taught courses at HILR and taken courses at LLAIC.


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Tue-1B-10The American Dream in Crisis

Course Leaders:  Mary Mansfield and Richard Mansfield

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

The years since 1960 have borne witness to profound shifts in America. In our contemporary economy, job security has become a vanishing expectation, and the possibilities for upward mobility are remote for many Americans.  The structure of our society has changed. A new, affluent and well-educated upper class has emerged, along with a new lower class. The values and behaviors of these groups have diverged drastically, leaving a powerful upper class isolated residentially and culturally from mainstream America, and a struggling, increasingly dysfunctional lower-class, in which family and community supports have been significantly damaged. The two groups differ so dramatically in values and behavior that they constitute two different cultures. In this course we will explore what has been changing and why, the risks posed by the changes, and what could be done to restore the American dream. The class will use a variety of formats: large group discussions, small group work, individual exercises, film segments, video clips, and occasional short presentations by the Course Leaders. Students must be able to download and open pdf and Microsoft Word files. There will be about 60 pages of reading per week (1-2 hours).

Books and other resources: 

Robert Putnam, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015. Available from Amazon.com for $17.14.

Charles Murray, Coming Apart: The State of White America. New York: Crown Forum, 2012. Available from Amazon.com, $9.77

Biography:

Richard Mansfield’s first career was as an academic, teaching human development, educational psychology and statistics. For the past 30 years he has been a consultant, focusing in human resource management and organization development.  Mary Mansfield, a lifelong educator, has worked as a teacher, reading specialist, teacher trainer in inner city schools, career counselor, and college admissions director. As an independent educational consultant, she worked with parents and young people to help them select and apply to schools, colleges and alternative educational programs. She has extensive experience as a presenter, trainer, and workshop developer. Richard and Mary have each individually offered courses at LLAIC, and together they offered a course on issues in American education. They have offered this course once previously. Both are founding members of the LLAIC Board.


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Thu-3D-10Hard Times: Contemporary Challenges II

Course Leaders:  Richard Mansfield and Marty Nichols

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

Do you finish reading, listening to or watching the latest news shaking your head and wondering whether “the world is going to hell in a handbasket”? Join us as we continue to use in-depth essays and articles, from different points of view, which have appeared in such respected periodicals as The New York Review of Books, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Foreign Affairs, Commentary and National Review to better understand and confront some of the most vexing issues that we face as a nation and a world.

This will not be a lecture course. We expect that class members will participate in lively discussions facilitated by the class leaders.  Each class meeting will deal with a different subject and will be independent of other weekly sessions. While we hope that members can attend all sessions, we understand that this is not always possible. Missing a class will not compromise participation in other weeks. 

We will address issues not covered in the spring 2016 term but may revisit some subjects if warranted by new events. We will use new essays and articles. The articles selected for discussion will be sent to the class via email attachments in Microsoft Word or pdf format. Participants must be able to use email and to open attachments in pdf or Microsoft Word format. Assignments should take 1½ to 2 hours.

Books and other resources: 

Articles will be provided by email.

Biography:

Richard Mansfield: My first career was as an academic, teaching human development, educational psychology and statistics. For the past 30 years I have been a consultant, focusing on human resource management and organization development. I am a founding member of the LLAIC Board and have led the New York Review of Books extra-curricular group. At LLAIC I have taught a course on creativity and co-taught others on issues in American Education, The American Dream in Crisis and Contemporary Challenges.

Marty Nichols: I did my undergraduate study at Yale and took my graduate dental degree at Harvard. I was an Army dentist for two years and then spent the rest of my working life in private practice in suburban Boston. I have been involved with lifetime learning programs for the past 20 years. I have been a member and frequent facilitator of groups that have discussed contemporary short fiction and US foreign policy. At LLAIC I have been a co-leader of courses on Contemporary Short Stories and Contemporary Challenges.


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Wed-3B-10Writing a Memoir: One Story at a Time

Course Leader:  Carole McNamee

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 14

Course Description: 

Only you can tell your unique story. Whether for children, grandchildren, family, friends, or a wider audience our stories can amuse, bemuse, and offer “aha moments” with a richness that only you as the experiencer can provide. This class will introduce the memoir as a literary genre and quickly proceed to writing exercises in and out of class to facilitate the development of your own memoir. Bring an openness to exploring your life experiences, a willingness to share your experiences with others, and an ability to witness the sharing of others. 

Books and other resources: 

Zinsser, William. (2004).  Writing About Your Life: A Journey into the Past. Marlowe & Company. New York.

Biography:

Carole McNamee has recently retired from two careers: the first, a professor of computer science and the second, a marriage and family therapist with a specialization in the therapeutic use of the creative arts. Carole has written extensively on the therapeutic uses of the expressive arts and has facilitated groups using creative expression at the Friends General Conference annual gathering, the Friends Conference on Religion and Psychology (FCRP) and the Washington FCRP annual meetings as well as Round Oaks Creative Center in Charlottesville, VA, and Warm Hearth Retirement Village in Blacksburg, VA as well as at LLAIC last spring. Carole founded and directed the Willowbank Creative Center also in Blacksburg, VA. All of these activities have focused on personal experience as a touchstone for individual learning.


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Thu-3C-5bShakespeare, Opera, and Ballet:  Transforming One Art Form into Another

Course Leader:  Lois Novotny

Course length/Start5-week course starting Oct. 27 (second half)

Course Description: 

Celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death by exploring how his works have been transformed into other art forms for the theater. We’ll consider the changes made in creating operas and ballets based on some of his best-known plays. After an introduction, each week will focus on a single work, and a large part of each class will be watching segments of stellar performances of the operas and ballets on DVDs. Some of what we will cover includes Verdi’s Otello, Verdi’s Macbeth, Verdi’s Falstaff, based on The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet (Macmillan choreography).

No prior knowledge of music, opera, or ballet required. I will identify the sections of each play that I will focus on, and hope that students can be familiar with them as well as the general outline of each play.

Biography:

Lois Novotny completed doctoral work for a Ph.D. in musicology before the realities of the academic marketplace led her to law school. She has attended opera and ballet in her native New York for many years, returning there since her relocation to Boston to attend performances at the Met, as well as performances at many of the great opera houses of Europe, including La Scala, La Fenice, and the Maryiinsky and Bolshoi theaters. 


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Tue-2A-10
The Book of Genesis

Course Leader:  Rabbi Robert Orkand

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

This course focuses on the first book of the Bible (in both the Jewish and Christian canons), the book of Genesis. This particular book is an extremely rich text that can be approached from a variety of perspectives, including literary, historical, theological, and archaeological. Most of the stories in Genesis are well known, but many crucial issues in the study of the book are less familiar to general audiences.

The course will speak to the different perspectives listed above. First and foremost, we will approach the text as a piece of literature, highlighting the many literary devices and techniques employed by the ancient author(s) of the book. In the process, we will learn that literature played a central role in the life of ancient Israel.

We will talk about the history that lies behind the book of Genesis, such as when Abraham lived. And, we will raise fundamental questions as to whether the biblical characters lived at all. And we will delve into theological issues: Did the ancient Israelites believe in one God?  Most importantly, we will deal with questions of authorship. Is the book the result of a haphazard compilation of disparate sources? Or does it present itself as a unified literary whole, suggesting a single author?

Finally, we will explore topics that emanate from our reading of Genesis. For example, we will explore the question of women in the Bible.

This course will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Readings will be provided. Any version of the Bible will do, and assignments will be minimal. Computer ability is handy for the downloading of reading materials.

Biography:

Rabbi Robert Orkand served as a pulpit rabbi from 1973 to 2013 when he retired. He and his wife moved to the Boston area to be near grandchildren, which has afforded him the opportunity to teach adults in a variety of settings, including LLAIC where he has taught comparative religions.


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Tue-2C-10A Journey into American Feminism through History and Literature  

Course Leader:  Alorie Parkhill

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

This course is about equality of gender, an issue that should concern every living being. Men!  If you have a mother, a wife, a daughter, a granddaughter, a female cousin, a good woman friend or neighbor, you are an essential part of this discussion. Women! The same goes for you, and include yourself. We will consider the three “waves” of feminist history in the United States, beginning in the nineteenth century through today. Yes, women and men have made meaningful progress, but there are still miles to go before we sleep. The literature during the waves often reflected the personal details of what women experienced in their constricted roles. Among writings from many sources, we will read Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Susan Glaspell’s A Jury of Her Peers, Tillie Olson’s Tell Me a Riddle and collected readings from numerous other sources, including male feminists. As musician John Legend wrote: "We are better off when women are empowered—it leads to a better society. Our goal is to understand why feminism matters in education, jobs, relationships, and probably every other aspect of life. Perhaps we then may better empathize with our world family and try to help make the changes so desperately needed." Students will receive articles by email, and assignments should take approximately two hours, depending on reading rates.

Books and other resources: 

A History of U.S. Feminisms, by Rory Dicker (Seal Press, 2008)
The Awakening, Kate Chopin, A Norton Critical Edition (second), edited by Margo Culley (WW Norton & Co.)—this edition has much extra information about the period
We Should All Be Feminists, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Anchor Books, 2015)
“Trifles” and “A Jury of Her Peers,” by Susan Glaspell   ISBN: 978-1494892463

Copies of material that I will send out

Biography:

I am a teacher by trade and passion. I began early, writing and directing plays for children. My main teaching career took place at The Cambridge School of Weston over more than 40 years. I taught English as well as courses in myth and religion. Recently, I have taught a few short classes there again and was delighted to discover that I could still work with teens in a meaningful way. After retirement, I continued to offer courses in various lifelong learning programs (Buddhism, Myths and Toni Morrison). I have taught Buddhism and Non-Fiction (twice) at LLAIC, as well as this course in Feminism. I was one of the founders of LLAIC, where I continue to relish learning, together, with my classes.


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Thu-2A-5a5 Easy Pieces: A History of Klezmer Music from the Middle Ages to the Present

Course Leader:  Judith Pinnolis

Course length/Start5-week course starting Sept. 15 (first half)

Course Description: 

This is the story of ‘klezmer’ music. We’ll start with some history of the music of Jewish Ashkenazi ancestors in Europe, listen to musical developments in medieval through 19th century Europe, and hear what moved to America. We’ll hear music from the earliest recordings available and examine klezmer music as part of American Jewish life. We’ll learn about the revival movement of the 1970s and 80s and the transformation of Eastern European music into American klezmer in the 1990s. We’ll finish our last class with a look at the worldwide klezmer “world music” scene today. The goal of this class is to provide a 5-week overview of the history and development of klezmer music that will put today’s music into perspective. This class will be by presentation, listening and discussion. No reports will be required. There is no prior knowledge required. Occasionally, music listening outside of class may be offered, so computer access to email and the internet will be useful. There may be about an hour of homework.

Biography:

M.M., College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati

; M.S., Simmons College.

Judith S. Pinnolis serves as an Adjunct Faculty at the School of Jewish Music at Hebrew College and has also taught at the Debbie Friedman School of Sacred Music at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. She is creator and editor of The Jewish Music WebCenter, a go-to resource in Jewish music, and has published many book reviews and scholarly articles on Jewish music including 13 articles in Encyclopedia Judaica. Pinnolis retired as Humanities Librarian from Brandeis University in 2014 where she served for more than 22 years. She also led many BOLLI courses at Brandeis. As a professional librarian, Pinnolis served as Chair of the Chapters Council of the Association of College and Research Libraries; President of the ACRL New England chapter; and Chair of the Jewish Music Roundtable of the Music Library Association.


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Tue-1C-10History, Mysteries and Masters of Glass

Course Leader:  David Rosen

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

Did Phoenician traders accidentally discover glass-making 5000 years ago?  Our artistic journey begins in Mesopotamia, moves throughout Europe, the Middle East, and arrives in colonial America.  Artistic techniques and styles constantly evolved.  Today, artists in the American Studio Glass movement, in conjunction with artists worldwide, are creating exceptional works in glass. We will follow the development of glass art over the centuries, and will note how, at times, local politics and government policies influenced the artists' environment.  Videos and photos will allow us to view amazing examples of glass art and gain an understanding of how (and why) glass masters practice their craft. Prior knowledge of glass art is not required. Each class will consist of a PowerPoint presentation containing embedded photos and/or videos.  Q&A and discussion of the subjects presented will be included as needed, or will be found on various internet sites.  There will not be any paper handouts. Familiarity with computer use is essential. All homework reading assignments will be sent as e-mail attachments and should take approximately an hour.

Biography:

David Rosen has a BS and MS in Chemical Engineering from MIT and an MBA from BC. He comments that “Glass must be in my DNA. My grandfather (and his father before him) worked in a glass factory near Pinsk, Russia over 100 years ago. As a collector, I remain fascinated by the intrinsic beauty and artists’ creations of exciting forms in glass.”


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Tue-2D-5aThe Humanity of Heinrich Böll: Selected Short Stories

Course Leader:  Peter Schmidt

Course length/Start5-week course starting Sept. 13 (first half)

Course Description: 

Heinrich Böll: reluctant soldier, vital participant in restarting German literature after WWII, activist for peace and human rights, Nobel Prize winner in literature.  His short stories build on and extend the genre; written in everyday language, they explore human themes as lived by ordinary people. In this 5-week course, we’ll read selected short stories and examine them together in class for their meaning, symbolism and structure, and for what they say to us today. They’ll deserve multiple readings and everyone’s participation in the discussions. Assignments may take from 2-3 hours.

Books and other resources: 

Either one of the two listed books contains the stories that we'll read and discuss:

The Stories of Heinrich Böll
, translated by Leila Vennewitz
. Northwestern University Press (1995)
. 
ISBN-10: 0-8101-1207-8
;  ISBN-13: 978-0810112070

The Collected Stories of Heinrich Böll
, Translated by Leila Vennewitz and Breon Mitchell. 
Melville House

ISBN-10: 1612190022;  ISBN-13: 978-1-61219-002-0

Biography:

Coming to the U.S. as a young immigrant from Germany led me to careers in physics and machine vision engineering. My interest in modern German literature, and especially short stories, was enhanced by a number of courses taken at the Goethe Institute in Boston. Over the last ten years, I’ve given a number of courses at lifelong learning organizations in a variety of subjects, some scientific (e.g., Five Physicists who Changed the World View), and some not (e.g., Three Masterpieces: From Drama to Film and Opera).


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Tue-1D-10The New Testament: What’s it all About?

Course Leader:  Carol Shedd

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

The New Testament is a small book which encompasses the foundational narrative of the Christian story and its core beliefs. We will be reading themes from the Four Gospels, asking for whom were the gospels written, and to what purpose. Who was this man Jesus and what was his message? We will examine the history of the church’s beginning from the Book of Acts. Who was Saul and how did he get into the act? What were the divisive issues between the Jewish followers of Jesus? In letters to the Early Churches what did these ordinary letters to newly formed groups of Christ followers, tell us about the beginnings of Christianity? Finally, we will consider Revelation in the New Testament and the Hebrew Bible. The Bible has been interpreted over the years in many different ways; this course will focus on trying to understand the book in the context of its historical setting, and how it has been read and used over the centuries. Through open and honest discussion, relevant audiovisuals and a careful reading of the text, it is expected/hoped that all will discover new meanings and understanding of a book that has influenced history for both good and bad.  Assignments should take one or more hours of reading.

Books and other resources: 

Any New testament will do. I recommend:

The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version  (Oxford University Press) This has very good notes and articles.

Or, a very readable, faithful translation:

Good News Bible with Deuterocanonicals/Apocrypha and Imprimatur. GNT, flexcover by American Bible Society

Biography:

I retired in 2001 from the Center of Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard, where I was Director of Outreach for 14 years, offering workshops to teachers on social, political and religious issues in the Middle East. Since then, I have led many courses on the Bible and World Religions at Harvard, Brandeis and Regis LLs. My degrees are in Literature, Library Science and Religion. 


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Thu-2D-5bSelected Topics in Crime, Punishment and Prevention

Course Leader:  Sandy Sherizen

Course length/Start5-week course starting Oct. 27 (second half)

Course Description: 

This is a 5-week exploration of major crime issues.  The purpose is to introduce various approaches to understanding why people commit crimes and what, if anything, can be done to prevent these acts. We will examine various theories about why people become criminals, major categories of crime, crime control strategies, the politics of crime, why certain people become victims (victimology) and emerging crimes such as cyber-crimes. Criminological, sociological, psychological, economic and other perspectives will be discussed in terms of how successful these approaches are in explaining crime problems.  Hot topics of the day will be examined, including white collar crime, why the U.S. has such an extraordinary imprisonment rate, how race and class determines who gets arrested and other critical crime problems.  Examples will be given from the U.S, as well as other nations. Computer ability not required but encouraged.  I will send out readings and videos links for supplementary information. My classes are very interactive.  Questions and comments from the class are encouraged and will be discussed. I will start each session with an overview of the topic of the week and then open a discussion on the questions provided for each issue.  Examples will be discussed and videos will be shown. I encourage class members to volunteer for a 10-minute presentation on a topic of interest.  I would provide suggestions on topics and various materials that are readily available. 

Books and other resources: 

I will prepare and distribute a set of readings from professional journals, think tank analyses, government reports, news articles and other relevant sources. 

Biography:

Trained as a sociologist, I then went bad and became a criminologist and then really bad by becoming a computer security and privacy professional.  I have taught at various universities, led seminars and given speeches in many settings around the world.  Flunking retirement, I volunteer to teach ESL to adult immigrants and serve on a patient research ethics and safety board at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  I have taught lifelong courses on Your Privacy is at Risk, The Sociology of “Deviant” Behaviors and Surviving the Inquisition:  Marranos/Crypto Jews/ Conversos.


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Wed-1A-10The Sporting Life in Film

Course Leader:  Irwin Silver

DCourse length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 14

Course Description: 

The film industry has produced many award-winning movies about sports. Most of these movies have received Academy Award nominations and Oscars. Some of these films are inspirational and some are comedies. We will watch 10 of these movies and have a discussion after each one is shown. A few of the films that we will watch and discuss are: The Pride of the Yankees, Chariots of Fire, Moneyball, Brian’s Song, Hoosiers, Breaking Away and Field of Dreams. I will supply readings and discussion questions by email. The course will run for two consecutive time periods. I will supply reading material each week, and reading should take approximately an hour.

Biography:

Irwin received a Bachelor of Science Degree from Northeastern University. After 46 years in the Investment Industry, he retired as a First Vice President-Investments from a national investment firm. He was also an adjunct Professor at Northeastern University. Irwin has taught four film classes at LLAIC as well as at other lifelong learning programs.


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Thu-2E-10George Washington: A Reluctant and Indispensable President

Course Leader:  Marvin Snider

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

George Washington, our first president, did not aspire to be president. Yet, we might still be a colony of Great Britain except for the efforts of George Washington and the French who were primarily responsible for the outcome of the Revolution with their military expertise and financing. He reluctantly accepted the office at the behest of all of his peers, Jefferson, Hamilton, Adams, Madison and others as being essential to launching our country. Ironically, it was his reticence that imbued confidence he would not abuse the office. Washington has gained relatively less attention, other than being revered as the father of our country. In this course we will review the details of his life to consider the strengths of his personality and character, and the historical elements of his transition from farmer to reluctant soldier and statesman. We will journey through Washington’s twofold challenge to wrestle the Colony from the British and convince congress to fund the war. Washington had an amazing capacity to function under the direst conditions as leader of the Revolutionary War. He demonstrated bravery and fortitude in managing and recruiting a rag tag army comprised of militias of limited commitment. They lacked everything an army needs to fight—money, clothes, food, and training. His situation was hair-raising against the well-trained, well-equipped British army.  In truth, Washington lost more battles than he won. His greatest success came from the only military strategy open to him - guerilla warfare and a form of battle totally alien to the British. We will discuss how he managed to cope with and juggle both wartime challenges of dealing with Congress and individual states to bring about the support needed to achieve autonomy and freedom from Britain. Homework should take approximately one to two hours.

Books and other resources: 

Washington – A Life, by Ron Chernow, Penguin Books (2005)
The CL will provide supplemental material.

Biography:

Marvin Snider has a PhD in psychology and has practiced both as a clinician and an organizational consultant. He has led many courses on diverse topics at both LLAIC and the Harvard Life Learning Program, including courses on International Hot Spots, Innovators of Political Thought, Cults, Elections, George Washington-The Indispensable Man, Lincoln, Ben Franklin and currently Teddy Roosevelt.


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Tue-1A-10The Evolution of the Modern Middle East

Course Leader:  Harriett Janel Starrett

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 13

Course Description: 

This course considers how the Middle East became such a flashpoint in history. Admittedly, the "Arab-Israeli" Conflict dominates the news, but it does not provide an adequate explanation for the extraordinary events that are currently taking place. The Middle East is, literally "the middle" which connects, geographically, culturally, and now economically, the entire world.  Its cultural and political conflagrations have dominated history. Its natural resources and transportation routes have been relied upon for ages.  But we don't understand the Middle East; Western forms of organization and military force cannot control it. Let us discuss why this is the case, as well as the decisions the United States must make.  Reading is about 35-45 pages per week.

Books and other resources: 

The Middle East: A Brief History of the Last 2000 Years by Bernard Lewis. A "Reading/Discussion Guide" will be provided.

Biography:

The CL has graduate degrees in economic history, and business. Previous to a business career she was a college (Northeastern) and high school teacher. Her business career began in international consulting with a major firm, working for businesses worldwide. The thrust of the work involved assisting businesses in deciding what products/markets/ to develop, and what their level of investment should be (strategic planning). Following international consulting, the CL was a director/officer/manager in a number of large companies in the defense, telecommunications, finance, and hospitality industries. She has taught many courses, in history and economics, for lifelong learning programs.


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Wed-2D-5bLILAC Players

Course Leader:  Judie Strauss

Course length/Start5-week course starting Oct. 26 (second half)

Course Description: 

LILAC Players will meet the last five weeks of classes with the goal of presenting our play during lunch on the last class day.  Members will use scripts, so no memorizing is involved. We will add props and costumes each week. A play has not yet been selected, but will be something fun and entertaining.  We always have fun reading, rehearsing, and bonding. 

Though this is listed as a course in this catalogue, there is no charge, and it does not count against your limit of 2 ten week equivalent courses.  For more info contact Judie Strauss at judieshel@verizon.net.

Biography:

Judie Strauss has always had an interest in the theater from the time she was 12 and saw Annie Get Your Gun. She majored in education and taught middle school, after which she got a Masters in Counseling and worked in social services. When any opportunity arose, she appeared in temple and community plays: Music Man, Hello Dolly, and also Guys and Dolls at her temple, where she was the producer. In addition to participating in almost all the BOLLI plays, she directed both at a local senior center.  She directed Autumn Nocturne, a play by Verne Vance, last semester for LLAIC.    She enjoys helping people become their characters and completely expressing themselves.


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Wed-3C-5aReconstruction (1865-1877): Its Legacy in our Time

Course Leader:  Joanne Tuck

Course length/Start5-week course starting Sept. 14 (first half)

Course Description: 

“The North won the war but the South won the peace.”  Anonymous

The era of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War was fraught with immense challenges, intense debates and significant violence. Slavery had been abolished and the status of former slaves brought drastic changes to their lives and to the Southern culture. Equality needed definition and protection under the law.  The South had to rebuild its economy, social structure and re-enter the union. The struggles of the federal government to deal with the complex concerns of the day were exacerbated by the polarized visions of the Congress and President Andrew Johnson. These struggles and concerns had profound ramifications for the course of our history: amendments, extreme violence, Jim Crow laws, segregation, racism and injustice.  We shall explore these policies and attitudes and their lingering effects on our society today. It is recommended that class members be able to download videos from YouTube, download pdf documents sent by me or other members, and be able to communicate via email. Assignments should take about two hours.

Books and other resources: 

The Reconstruction Era and The Fragility of Democracy.  Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation, Boston: 2015.
I shall supplement with handouts and a suggested reading list.

Biography:

I taught at Wentworth Institute of Technology for many years. I received degrees from B.U. in History and Social Education and studied the Holocaust and Civil Rights extensively at Facing History, an educational organization whose mission is the examination of prejudice, racism, and antisemitism in the Holocaust and other violent historical events to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry while students confront the moral choices in their own lives. In 2004 I was awarded the Teaching Award at Wentworth by peers and students and in 2010 was the recipient of the Margot Stern Strom Outstanding Teaching Award from Facing History. I had brought Facing History to Wentworth in 1983, and in 2012, I completed my most important work: “An Educator’s Legacy: Reflections of Teaching Facing History” and the 25 year study “The Long Term Impact of the Facing History and Ourselves Elective Course at Wentworth Institute of Technology.”  Since my retirement I’ve enjoyed three terms of excellent courses at LLAIC and hope my teaching will be a way to give back.


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Thu-1B-10Gods and Broads: Four Ancient Greek Plays

Course Leader:  Lois Ziegelman

Course length/Start10-week course starting Sept. 15

Course Description: 

Although the emphasis in the particular plays we will read is on four remarkable women, the tension between the masculine and the feminine is the dominant motif. Underscoring the dictum that the more things change the more they remain the same, the dramatists of the golden age of Greece focus on religion, politics and sex: the three major topics which still engage us today. We will read four plays in the following order: 1. Agamemnon by Aeschylus, 2. Electra by Euripides, 3. Iphigenia by Euripides, and 4. Lysistrata by Aristophanes. It is expected that class participants will volunteer to act out scenes in addition to lecture and discussion. Any text of the plays will be acceptable.

Books and other resources: 

Agamemnon by Aeschylus
Electra by Euripides
Iphigenia by Euripides
Lysistrata by Aristophanes. 

Any text of the plays will be acceptable.

Biography:

Lois Ziegelman Ph.D. is a Professor Emeritus from Framingham State University, where she taught world literature and drama for 31 years. A recipient of five fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, she has studied, taught and performed works ranging from classical antiquity through the twentieth century.


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Page updated July 22, 2016

Ċ
Peter Schmidt,
Jul 16, 2016, 8:07 AM
Ċ
Peter Schmidt,
Jul 2, 2016, 5:53 AM
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