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Course Descriptions - Spring 2017

Spring 2017 Course Descriptions

Course descriptions are presented in alphabetical order by Course Leader (CL) last name.

Course Day and Time:  To find out when a course is being given, click on Course Schedule here or at the end of any course description.

Course codes also contain the day, period and course length information:

  • 1Tue, 2Wed, 3Thu designate the day the course is given (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday);
  • In the middle field, 1, 2 or 3 stand for the period in which the course is given on that day;
  • In the rightmost field, 10 and 5 stand for the course length in weeks; 5a or 5b means that the course is given in the first or second half of the semester, respectively;
Printable file of the Course Schedule and Course Descriptions (28 pages): click here or go to the bottom of this page to print or view the file "Spring 2017 Course Descriptions.pdf".

 In the table below, click on the CL name to go to the course description:

Course Code
Course Leader
Course Title
3Thu-1B-10 Suzanne Art
From Frou-frou to Heroic: French Paintings of the 18th and Early 19th Centuries
2Wed-3B-5b Ruth Kramer Baden
Stanley Kunitz’ The Wild Braid - A Poet...in the Garden
2Wed-2D-10 Robert Berlin
Climate Change: The Greatest Threat to our Planet or Hoax
2Wed-1D-5b Liz Cabot
More Virginia Woolf
3Thu-2B-5a Phyllis Cohen
New Yorker Short Fiction Colloquium
(Not being given this semester)
2Wed-1B-10 Arthur Finstein
Why Sing Plays? An Exploration into the Craft of American Musical Theater
2Wed-1E-5a Mitch Fischman
Boston’s Skyline - Boom or Bust
3Thu-1D-10 Alice Freedman
The Fiction of Ian McEwan
(Not being given this semester)
1Tue-1D-10 Joel Freedman
Introduction to Digital Photography
3Thu-2E-10 Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan
Sleuths for All Seasons: a Global Survey
3Thu-1C-10 Harriet and Dick Kahn
Ten of our Favorite Short Stories
1Tue-1C-10 Joel Kamer
Short Stories with a Dash of Math
2Wed-2B-10 Michael Kaufman
Literature on Leadership
3Thu-2C-5b Arnold Kerzner
Everything You Wanted to Know About Hormones, but Were too Exhausted to Ask
3Thu-3B-5a Bonnie Lass Bobby Zimmerman: Nobel Laureate
2Wed-3D-5b Bette Lehman
Tales of Seduction and Betrayal: Short Stories of the Modern Age
3Thu-3A-5b Carole Levy
Philip Roth: The Historical Dimensions of his Literature
(Now a second-half 5-week course)
1Tue-1A-10 Mary and Richard Mansfield
Beyond IQ and Talent: Grit and Emotional Intelligence
2Wed-1C-5a Carole McNamee
Writing a Memoir: Continuing the Story 
 1Tue-2B-10 Marty Nichols
Great Decisions +2
1Tue-2C-5a Lois Novotny
Shakespeare, Opera, and Ballet:  Transforming One Art Form into Another
1Tue-2A-10 Rabbi Robert Orkand More from the Book of Genesis
1Tue-1B-10 Alorie Parkhill
Moving Through this Life as a Woman, Man or a Variation on the Theme
(Not being given this semester)
2Wed-1A-10 Judith Pinnolis
Jews and French Film
2Wed-2C-10 Myrna Rybezyk and Theo Koziol
Writing a Memoir: One Story at a Time
(Not being given this semester)
3Thu-3C-5a Sandy Sherizen
Selected Hot Topics in Crime, Punishment, and Prevention
3Thu-1A-10 Irwin Silver
Comedy: Laughter on Film
2Wed-3C-10 Marvin Snider
Hamilton
2Wed-3A-10 Harriet Janel-Starrett How to Develop a Vibrant/Productive American Economy
3Thu-3D-5bJudie StraussLILAC Players
1Tue-2D-5b Joanne Tuck Reconstruction (1865-1877): Its Legacy in Our Time
3Thu-2D-10 Lois Ziegelman
Anna Karenina


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3Thu-1B-10:  From Frou-frou to Heroic: French Paintings of the 18th and Early 19th Centuries

Course Leader:  Suzanne Art

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2

Course Description:

Course description After the death of Louis XIV in 1715, the fun-loving Duke of Orleans ruled as regent for his 5-year-old nephew, and France turned away from imperial aspirations to focus on more personal—and pleasurable—pursuits. This change led to a new style in art, known as the Rococo, which was highly decorative, playful, and often erotic. On the earthier side, Chardin and Greuze painted domestic scenes of the struggling lower classes. As protests escalated against the monarchy by mid-century, social critics cried out for a more morally uplifting type of art. The new Neoclassical style paid tribute to Roman republican virtues and helped fuel the French revolutionary fervor. By the end of the century, the Romantic style, presenting nature as an uncontrollable and unpredictable power, shifted the art world in a new direction. Through an in-depth study of the paintings of these three movements in France, we will learn about the evolution of artistic technique as well as the fascinating and often turbulent times that the paintings reflect. There will be a balance of background lectures by the CL and group discussions of individual paintings.

Weekly assignments are about an hour to an hour and a half.  Computer ability is needed, since all assignments are online.


Books and Other Resources: 

All assignments will be online; these include short biographies and historical overviews as well as videos of art historians discussing specific paintings and periods of French history.

Biography:

I have always loved art and history. I have a BA in History, an MA in the French Language and Literature, and an MA in Teaching. I taught history for 16 years at a private school. During that time, I also wrote a series of twelve history books, a major feature of which is the study of the art of a given culture. I have taught four art courses at LLAIC: Painters of the Italian Renaissance, Three Giants of the Northern Renaissance, Let’s Go for Baroque, and From Frou-frou to Heroic.


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2Wed-3B-5b:  Stanley Kunitz’ The Wild Braid - A Poet...in the Garden

Course Leader:  Ruth Kramer Baden

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 5 (second half)

Course Description:

Whether you haven’t read a poem since elementary school or are an avid poetry reader, Stanley Kunitz’ The Wild Braid will move and delight you. In this, his final, very accessible book of prose and poetry, written in his nineties, Kunitz reflects on his life and creative callings as poet and gardener. Together we will read and discuss this bouquet of poems and commentary. Class members have found that this book speaks directly to their lives both past and present. This is primarily a discussion group with me serving as facilitator and guide. My goal is to impart my passion for poetry to the group members. Poetry is not a mystery. I will explain the different aspects of the poetic craft. For those members who wish to voluntarily try their hands at writing their own poems, I will give them the opportunity and guidance to do so. Each Kunitz poem will be read aloud by individual volunteers or sometimes by several members. Each week I will give a brief lecture on different aspects of the poetic craft, e.g.: sounds, rhythm, words, imagery and the music of poetry.

Preparation time is 1-2 hours. Basic computer ability is needed. I send out special articles in .pdf or .doc as well as weekly comments by e-mail.

Books and Other Resources: 

Stanley Kunitz, The Wild Braid: A Poet Reflects on a Century in the Garden W.W. Norton & Co., N.Y. ISBN 0393-06141-8. Paperback or hardcover, new or used.

Biography:

I have been writing poetry since high school, and have published since I was in high school, from Senior Scholastic then to poetry in many literary journals and a book of poems, “East of the Moon,” in 2010. I’m completing a manuscript for a second poetry book whose two subjects are women and aging. I have been fortunate to be able to lead groups in the understanding and enjoyment of poetry for fourteen years at Adult Learning Institutes.


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2Wed-2D-10:  Climate Change: The Greatest Threat to our Planet or Hoax

Course Leader:  Robert Berlin

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1

Course Description:

Do you agree with Nobel Prize winner Desmond Tutu that “Destruction of the earth’s environment is the biggest human rights challenge today”? Or do you believe, as does Donald Trump, that climate change is a hoax perpetuated by China, and will his administration of climate change deniers take actions that imperil the future of the planet? We will delve into all aspects of the issue, first clarifying the difference between “climate” and “weather” and examining the evidence of worldwide climate variations from their historical patterns. We will discuss these variations, especially those that are attributable to human activity, with an emphasis on the production and burning of fossil fuels. We will focus on what is being done now and what can be done in the future to minimize the effects of climate change. We’ll explore the complex politics and economics of the issue, from personal choices (What car should I buy?) to international agreements (i.e. The Paris Accords). What are the political and economic realities of reduced emissions, conversions to other energy sources (i.e. renewable, nuclear, hydroelectric, fracked gas)? Abatement actions to counter the increasing impacts of climate extremes will also be discussed. The class format will combine presentation and the lively discussion that comes from strong opinions about climate change. Assignments will be about one hour of readings per week from internet sites. Prior technical knowledge is not required.

Books and Other Resources: 

No texts will be used. I will work from a set of notes that will be provided to each class member. The copying cost will be approximately $15 per person.

Biography:

Trained originally as an engineer, and employed in the development of advanced energy systems, my work became environmentally oriented after obtaining a doctorate in Public Health. I worked in the environmental and energy fields for over 50 years, both in the private and government sectors. I taught environmental and engineering courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels and to industrial and lay audiences. I am a licensed professional engineer, reactor operator, and health physicist and coauthored "Radioactive Waste Management" in 1988.


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2Wed-1D-5b:  More Virginia Woolf

Course Leader:  Liz Cabot

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 5 (second half)

Course Description:

Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is commonly considered her fictional masterpiece.  Written at the height of her powers, it tells of the Ramsay family and several friends, who annually gather for summer vacation by the ocean in Cornwall, England. There they work on writing and painting.  But WW1 and deaths intervene for many years, and when some of them return after a long absence, they try to sort out their new lives.

This novel deserves close attention by adults, who ponder the same subjects: marriage, friendship, death, memory, and what art can offer as solace and coherence. It’s often read by much younger readers who can’t fully appreciate it.  In this course we’ll read and examine the book in a discussion format and see the film version.  We’ll finish with Woolf’s last novel, Between the Acts, which focuses on dramatic art, a new direction for her at the end of her life. All this will build upon the experience of the Fall course on Mrs. Dalloway, but that is not a prerequisite.

Computer ability is not required. Assignments should take 2-2.5 hours of reading.

Books and Other Resources: 

To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf (Harcourt, 1989)
Between the Acts, by Virginia Woolf (Harcourt, 1970)

Both paperbacks at Amazon

Biography:

I received my Ph.D at Boston University.  My dissertation was on Virginia Woolf.  I spent 20 years teaching literature and composition at the college level, and 20 years teaching ELL to adults (all levels) at their workplace and at Newton Community Ed.  I have also trained tutors for ELL (ESL) for 5+ years


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3Thu-2B-5a:  New Yorker Short Fiction Colloquium
(Not being given this semester)
 
Course Leader:  Phyllis Cohen

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting March 2 (first half)

Course Description:

Like the storied Algonquin Round Table of almost 100 years ago, we will meet weekly to discuss the best short fiction of the day. Our source will be The New Yorker Magazine, but no subscription will be needed, we will use only those stories which are available on-line either currently or from their archives.  Members of the Roundtable who are interested, will be encouraged to lead the class on various weeks, thus testing out and honing their Class Leader skills. This is a participation class, not a lecture, and the course leader hopes that each week you will come armed with your best ideas about the characters, language, plot, setting, theme and so on. Computer ability will be required to download and print stories. Preparation should take two to three hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

The New Yorker (sent by email)

Biography:

I have led a New Yorker Fiction Discussion Group at another program for 6 years and also at the Weston Public Library and, with a co-leader, for one semester at LLAIC. My professional life was (and is) spent running my own small business, selling promotional and marketing items, writing newsletters for small businesses, and freelance writing. I am a graduate of Brandeis University and attended Framingham State for a Master’s Degree in Library Science.


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2Wed-1B-10 :
  Why Sing Plays?  An Exploration into the Craft of American Musical Theater


Course Leader:  Art Finstein

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1

Course Description:

We'll study three extraordinary mid-20th-century American musicals: West Side Story, 1776 and She Loves Me. Taken together, these pieces offer significant insight into the remarkable craft by which high-quality musical theater is created.  Each work takes a different approach to musicalizing its subject matter.  But all take advantage of common, basic compositional principles established centuries before in the world of opera. We'll define these bedrock ideas and then examine each show, focusing on the purposes, placement, structures and styles of songs, in an attempt to discover how creators' musical choices sharpen character and plot, and deepen the play's impact.

The course will consist of Course Leader presentation and group listening / viewing and discussion.  No reports will be expected, and no specific musical or theatrical skills are required. Including listening, viewing and reading, assignments could take approximately three hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

Any editions of West Side Story and Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet are fine.  But both are available together in a single Mass Market paperback, new from Amazon, c. $6.50 (and used, probably less.)

1776, by Edwards and Stone, is published in paperback by Applause Books, for $8-10 new and used from Amazon.  But I will provide a scan of the script and related material, via email, at no charge.

I will provide necessary materials for She Loves Me, as its source, the play, is not in print.  I'll also provide selected other relevant handouts as necessary.  ONLY if necessary, I hope each class member will contribute no more than c, $5-7 to defray the cost of copying any other materials.  But this is UNLIKELY.

Many of these items may also be available through the public library system (Minuteman Library Network) www.mln.lib.ma.us/  

Biography:

Arthur Finstein holds BA and MFA degrees in Music from Brandeis.  He’s a retired Massachusetts Music Educator and has music-directed more than 190 productions in the greater Boston scholastic, community and professional theater circuits over 40+ years.  He has presented at statewide, regional and national conferences on Music and Theater Education, and continues to advocate for increased support for the creative arts, especially for Music and Musical Theater. 


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2Wed-1E-5a:  Boston’s Skyline - Boom or Bust

Course Leader:  Mitch Fischman

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting March 1 (first half)

Course Description:

Boston is currently sustaining a real estate development boom not seen since the 1980’s. There were, of course, bust and boom periods throughout Boston’s history.  We will discuss the causes and local impacts of these periods up to and including the latest boom. We will also look at Boston’s historical development - physical resources (fill, water, and construction materials), preservation, population fluctuations, and evolving architectural trends. The course will review Boston’s 18th and 19th century expansions; discuss modern 20th-century urban renewal involving demolition of the West End and Scollay Square, construction of Government Center and New City Hall, redeveloping Back Bay and the Prudential Center, extension of the Mass Turnpike into Boston, and Pei’s John Hancock Tower. An optional field trip will be scheduled to City Hall Plaza to view the Boston Redevelopment Authority’s large scale model of the Downtown, and walk by nearby buildings we have reviewed during the course. During the fifth class, we will examine 21st Century trends and feature at least one outside speaker engaged in designing new downtown and neighborhood projects.  The class will consist of CL presentation and class discussion. Individual class reports will be encouraged.  Handouts will be sent to each class member by mail prior to commencement of classes or provided at the first class at an additional cost to the class members.  Supplemental weekly readings or videos will be sent by email, but no other computer ability is necessary. Assignments will take approximately two hours, plus or minus.

Books and Other Resources: 

Naomi Miller and Keith Morgan. Boston Architecture 1975-1990, published 1990, ISBN-10  3791310976 or ISBN-13  9783791310978.  Any edition should be fine.  Assignments will be by section titles and building numbers; page and building numbers referenced are from the 1990 book edition.


Biography:

Mitch Fischman is a planning and permitting consultant to developers, universities and hospitals, assisting in approvals for development projects through the Boston Redevelopment Authority (now Boston Planning and Development Agency).  As BRA Project Manager for 15 years in the 1970’s and 1980’s, he managed city approvals for major developments such as Copley Place, 500 Boylston Street, Prudential Center and other prominent downtown projects. He is an urban planner with a Masters degree in urban planning from University of Pittsburgh, an MBA from Northeastern University, and served as a City Councilor in Newton for 12-years until the end of 2013.


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3Thu-1D-10:  The Fiction of Ian McEwan

Course Leader:  Alice Freedman

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2

Course Description:

Is Ian McEwan one of your favorite contemporary authors?  If so, this class is for you!  If not, come to see why he could be!  The London Times named McEwan as one of the fifty greatest English authors since 1945.  An award-winning writer of numerous novels, short stories, screen plays, and oratorios, he’s also been given the moniker, “Ian Macabre,” for his dark fiction in which the characters typically face bizarre challenges, but his style has changed over the years.  In this course, we will identify the critical components of analyzing fiction (such as how he uses the environment to enhance his stories) and relate them to several of McEwan’s works. We will begin with short stories from First Love, Last Rites, and continue with such novels as The Comfort of Strangers, The Children Act and a big favorite, Atonement. We will also see some videos. Our literary exploration can provide a richer discernment and appreciation of this author’s writing, as well as future novels by other authors you may read. Assignments may take several hours per week, depending on one’s reading pace. Students will need to be able to download articles and videos.


Books and Other Resources: 

All books are by Ian McEwan, and we will begin with First Love, Last Rites and conclude with Atonement. Other likely books include: The Comfort of Strangers, On Chesil Beach, and The Children Act.

The class will be notified in good time to order books.

Biography:

Alice Freedman is a recent retiree of Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates where she was a member of the Organizational Development and Learning Department.  She coached supervisors and created and facilitated workshops on a variety of topics to give staff and physicians tools to enhance their success.  Prior to employment at HVMA, Alice spent nineteen years at Ceridian Corporation and Work/Family Directions where she managed the Seminar Department, developed over one hundred seminar topics, and led thousands of workshops on work/life issues to employees of major companies.  After graduating from Boston University with a B.A. in English, Alice taught English at Malden High School.  She also received an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Boston College. Alice is certified in Emotional Intelligence, Myers-Briggs Type Inventory, Coaching, and Stress Management.  She is excited to facilitate her first course at LLAIC where she looks forward to robust discussions about Ian McEwan’s writings. 


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1Tue-1D-10:  Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Leader:  Joel Freedman

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28

Course Description:

The goal is for you to look forward to “taking pictures” both as a challenge and a joy.  I hope that you will complete the course with confidence in your ability to “capture images” that you feel proud of, rather than just snapping pictures. The course is appropriate for beginners and photographers with some experience who would benefit from better understanding of 1) composition techniques aimed at landscape and, 2) composition techniques aimed at nature photography, and 3) gaining a better understanding of how their camera creates an image and how the various camera parameters affect the image. It will consist of discussion, AV, reports, and partial lecture.   We start with an overview of how the various settings on your camera influence the photo. We will then discuss various aspects of composition, and how the camera settings affect your composition. All of this will be tied together to help you to take the best picture possible. You will be emailed various papers to help you understand the material presented in class. There will be presentations on Landscape, Nature and Architectural photography. On different weeks, you will be asked to take pictures of specific kinds of subjects, such as architecture, wildlife, landscapes and people, and to send in a small number of your photos via email for review and comment. You should bring and use a digital camera that enables you to control aperture and shutter speed for your field work.  Cell phone camera use is not acceptable for this course. Depending on weather and class size, we will go into Boston and possibly one other location for a class photography session. Preparation time from week to week will vary.

Books and Other Resources: 

Recommended book:  Arizona Highways Photography Guide: How & Where to Make Great Pictures (Arizona Highways: Travel Arizona Collection, March 7, 2008, by Arizona Highways Editors and Contributors)

Biography:

I have been involved in photography for almost 50 years, starting out in scientific photography.  My photographic activities over the past 15 years have been during travel in Europe, followed by landscape and nature photography during guided photography tours in our national parks in the West and Alaska. I belong to a camera club and compete in the monthly photography competitions. I exhibit my works in local libraries, and have taught photography courses at the Brandeis OLLI.


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3Thu-2E-10:  Sleuths for All Seasons:  a Global Survey

Course Leader:  Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2

Course Description:

From Sherlock Holmes to Harry Bosch, we will investigate the best and brightest among the men and women who follow the clues to reveal the guilty.  The heart of the course will be the contemporary police procedural, currently the most popular sub-genre of mystery/crime fiction, in books, movies and TV.

We will compare and contrast top police professionals in four countries:  the US, UK, Sweden and Italy.  How do these very different cultures, with their divergent procedures, influence the art of detection?  Does the nature of the crime, or the character of the detective, differ depending on the country?  Do societies get the police they want – or deserve?

We start with a whirlwind tour of influential early (pre-1980) writers of mystery/crime/detective works.  And we’ll take some diverting side trips to enjoy other sleuths (forensic specialists, private investigators and reluctant amateurs) practicing the detective trade, and their interactions, sometimes cooperative, sometimes not, with the investigating officers.

The course will feature background lectures, guided group discussion, and brief video, including author interviews and movie clips.  For the first two classes, two or three short stories will be provided in PDF format by the CLs.  For the last eight classes, there will be a mystery novel to read each week.

We communicate with the class members by email a few times a week.  Students will also need the ability to read and/or print out PDF documents. Assignments will probably take a few hours, depending on reading rate.

Books and Other Resources: 

All the books on our list are available through the various libraries in the Minuteman Library System, as well as for purchase, both new and used. 
For weeks 1 and 2, short stories by Doyle, Carr, R. MacDonald, Ed McBain and others will be provided by the CLs in pdf  format by email.

Week 1 – Quick Look at Early Masters, Part I
Week 2 – Quick Look at Early Masters, Part II
Week 3 – In the Dark Places by Peter Robinson (Sleuth:  Alan Banks)
Week 4 – Death at La Fenice by Donna Leon (Sleuth: Guido Brunetti)
Week 5 – The Closers by Michael Connelly (Sleuth: Harry Bosch)
Week 6 – The Dogs of Riga by Henning Mankell (Sleuth: Kurt Wallender)
Week 7 – The Trespasser by Tana French (Sleuths: Antoinette Conway and Steve Moran)
Week 8 – Devil in a Blue Dress by Walter Mosley (Sleuth: Easy Rawlins)
Week 9 – The Coroner’s Lunch by Colin Cotterill (Sleuth: Dr. Siri Paiboun)
Week 10 – Started Early, Took My Dog by Kate Atkinson (Sleuth: Jackson Brodie)

Biography:

Sandy Grasfield, retired librarian and lifelong avid reader, has taught several courses at LLAIC and elsewhere.   She has been reading mysteries for years, at first surreptitiously, then openly after learning that John F. Kennedy and Winston Churchill were among those who reveled in mystery fiction.  Currently, she is thoroughly enjoying studying, researching and sharing what she’s learning about this varied genre.

Dana Kaplan has been an avid reader of mysteries, beginning (of course) with Nancy Drew. She reads many different types of crime fiction and resists the classification of fiction into dichotomies such as genre versus literary fiction. She has a particular interest in the interaction between mystery fiction and current life and between the portrayal of crime in books on the one hand and TV and film on the other. Her business career as a marketing team leader included creating and conducting many interactive staff training programs.


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3Thu-1C-10:  Ten of our Favorite Short Stories

Course Leader:  Harriet and Dick Kahn

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2

Course Description:

Reading short stories of merit and depth has become one of our great joys, as has sharing them with others. Each class is a unique experience, and we gain insights from class members in every discussion. We feel that as a peer group, we are learning together with the members, which puts us on an equal footing. We make careful choices of stories which will give us the opportunity to go into depth, exploring beyond plot, and considering theme, character, use of language and possible meanings. Each of us relates differently to the stories, based on individual experience; they resonate personally with most people and lead to profound and meaningful discussions. Sharing personal insights expands our own understanding. We also ask that students read each story twice. Students comment on how much more they see in a second reading because they can move beyond plot to the beauty and detail of the language. What does the title suggest? How do characters develop and change? What are the ambiguities? What is special about the language? Among the authors to be studied are Alice Munro, Andre Dubus II, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, John Cheever and five others carefully chosen for fruitful discussion.  All stories can be found online for easy access. Preparation should take about two hours to read and then re-read the assigned story.

Books and Other Resources: 

Stories will be at online sites and also available in various collections.

Biography:

We have spent twelve years presenting and discussing short stories with adult groups. We had taken a class before we started teaching regularly (and when we knew very little about the rich possibilities of short story). We quickly became enamored with the medium and began an adventure of reading everything we could get our hands on. Then we took the plunge into teaching our own classes, and our real education began. In our planning, we read stories aloud to each other, listening for the rhythm, the melody and beauty of the words.  We relish a sense of discovery together through hearing the voice of the author. We hope that people in our classes will have a similar experience when they read our selections.

Richard: I am a retired psychiatrist.  Harriet: An English major in college, I am a retired Early Childhood Educator who has an M. Ed from Tufts University in Child Study.


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1Tue-1C-10:Short Stories with a Dash of Math

Course Leader:  Joel Kamer

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28 

Course Description:

We will be reading an eclectic group of short stories all of which have a flavor of math in them (though sometimes a tenuous one!).  The authors cover a wide spectrum and include Jonathan Swift ("Cycloid Pudding"), Aldous Huxley (“Young Archimedes”), Jorge Luis Borges (“The Library of Babel”), John Cheever (“The Geometry of Love”), O. Henry (“The Chair of Philanthromathematics”), Arthur Koestler (“Pythagoras and the Psychoanalyst”), Karel Capek (“The Death of Archimedes”), Rebecca Goldstein (“The Geometry of Soap Bubbles”), Arthur C. Clarke (“The Nine Billion Names of God”), and others.  The stories range from serious to philosophical to whimsical to fun.  We’ll discuss the stories in depth and, on occasion, the CL will expound on the math referenced therein. I intend to print all of the stories for the class members (except the first, which is available in all libraries or the internet). Assignments should take approximately two hours.

Note: The Class Leader will not be available on April 18, so that class will be made up on May 16.

Books and Other Resources: 

I will get printed copies of all of the stories

Biography:

I learned reading at an early age and then, after ‘riting, I learned ‘rithmetic.  I found ‘rithmetic so enthralling that I went on to eventually receive a master’s degree in mathematics and another in actuarial science.  I became a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries, and put some of this learning to use.  In my spare time I’ve tried to maintain my reading skills, in particular by reading fiction.  Over the years I’ve read novels and short stories that indulged my love of mathematics.  In this course I’ll be sharing my favorite short stories of this genre that I’ve read over the years.


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2Wed-2B-10:  Literature on Leadership

Course Leader:  Michael Kaufman

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1

Course Description:

The word leadership is a relatively recent addition to the English language, first appearing in 1821. Its root, leader, however, dates from the earliest records of our language. Now, language reflects our cultural values; social change and leadership are useful examples. From the earliest period of civilization humans recognized that special individuals possessed exemplary qualities to steer the course that others would follow. It wasn’t until the 19th century when leaders were no longer exclusively men of rank, and when more individuals were needed to manage the increasingly complex systems unfolding in industry, social and political bureaucracies that leadership was transformed from the idea of exceptional charismatic individuals to a body of principles and complex dynamics that can be studied and transmitted.
       At one of the most challenging crossroads in our country’s existence, it seems imperative that we consider what qualities constitute good governance, and struggle to clarify our conception of transformative leadership. What exactly do we expect from those who shape the policies and make the decisions that shape our lives? What are those attributes that confer genuine respect of authority on those who happen to occupy positions of power?
       This discussion course is intended to explore some of the most critical qualities of leadership, such as: implementing change, responsibly exercising power, negotiating political pressures, assessing need and understanding consequences, communicating effectively, and making wise decisions. While the selected readings for the course will structure our discussions, real-world illustrations and applications will also be considered. The first meeting will be an introduction with a short hand-out to be provided when we meet. Computer ability is not required, and preparation time is approximately two to three hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

Shakespeare,  Henry IV Part I
G.B Shaw,  Major Barbara
Somerset Maugham,  “The Outstation”
George Orwell,  “Shooting an Elephant”
Joseph Conrad,  “The Secret Sharer”
Melville,  “Billy Budd”
Bertolt Brecht,  The Caucasian Chalk Circle
John Arden,  Left-Handed Liberty
Peter Weiss,  Marat/Sade

Biography:

I have been offering courses in Lifelong Learning programs for a number of years and believe that good literature provides a rather unique and vital way of thinking about important issues in our lives. I was a professor of literature for many years before retiring.


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3Thu-2C-5b:  Everything You Wanted to Know About Hormones, but Were too Exhausted to Ask

Course Leader:  Arnold Kerzner

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 6 (second half)

Course Description:

This course will address every aspect of our hormones. What are they? Where do they come from? What functions do they address? What role does genetics play? What happens when hormones don't work? What are the common illnesses caused by insufficient hormones (i.e. Diabetes, Thyroid conditions and others)? What happens as we age? What role do they play in falling in love and love making? Even when they have decreased, can they be re-activated? The course will include PowerPoint presentations and reference materials. It will be taught in a collaborative, sharing, interactive style with sufficient time for comments, questions, personal revelations, and plenty of laughter.  Reference materials will be provided, and preparation time should be one to two hours.

This class will be offered April 6, 27, May 4, 11 and 18 (no class on April 20, with the last class in the make-up week).


Biography:

As a Pediatrician and Child/Family Psychiatrist, I have treated numerous conditions related to hormone increases and decreases. I consider our hormones one of the most important parts of our unique, energy, growth, social and emotional systems. It is rare for every person to have a "perfect balance" of all our hormones, but we are a very resilient mammal in the ways we manage our imperfect, hormonal systems. Without these hormones, our human race would not propagate itself, since one of the most significant hormones, Oxycontin, is considered the Love Hormone and is essential for providing the necessary ingredients for falling in love, love-making, and keeping the feeling of being wanted and needed alive and well.


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3Thu-3B-5a :
  Bobby Zimmerman: Nobel Laureate  


Course Leader:  Bonnie Lass

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting March 2 (first half)

Course Description:

Many were surprised (and some chagrined) when on Oct. 13, 2016, Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Would the iconoclastic, quixotic, now 75-year old Dylan deign to be in Stockholm to accept the prize? "Absolutely, if it’s at all possible,” Dylan said after several weeks of suspense. He is the second person besides George Bernard Shaw to have won both an Oscar and the Nobel Prize.

Bob Dylan has been influential in popular music and culture for more than five decades and is an artist in several media. He’s sold 100 million records (37 albums), published six books of drawings and paintings and a best-selling and well-received memoir, acted in movies, and continues to tour, performing as many as 100 shows a year.

In this 5-week course, we’ll explore Dylan’s life and listen to his songs, focusing especially on the lyrics, which reveal a wide range of personal revelations and political, social, philosophical, and literary influences.

Computer ability is necessary, both for course information emails and for homework assignments that include YouTube videos and online articles. Preparation should take two to three hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

•    Chronicles, Volume One by Bob Dylan. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2004.
•    Song and Dance Man, The Art of Bob Dylan, 3rd edition, by Michael Gray New York: Continuum, 2002.
•    No Direction Home: Bob Dylan. PBS, American Masters: directed by Martin Scorcese.
•    Website: www.expectingrain.com/

Biography:

I have a professional background in teaching, writing, and editing (Ph.D. University of Illinois) and have taught remedial reading to kids in Brooklyn, reading and language arts techniques to teachers, and written and edited educational materials for both teachers and kids.

At BOLLI, and now at LLAIC, I’ve had a chance to stretch into avocations. I love popular music and its history and enjoyed teaching The Blues. I love literature and have led courses in Reading Contemporary Memoirs and New Yorker fiction. My course in Dylan will be an opportunity to combine literature and popular music.


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2Wed-3D-5b:  Tales of Seduction and Betrayal:  Short Stories of the Modern Age

Course Leader:  Bette Lehman

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 5 (second half)

Course Description:

These universal concepts have intrigued humankind since we first began creating oral tales, myths and legends to explain our place in the world. The story of Adam and Eve is but one case in point.  We shall explore modern variations on these themes by examining elements of setting, point of view, symbolism, form and content in each story. Our method of inquiry will be “close reading” of the text and our format will be seminar style discussion with emphasis on group participation.  Participants will be encouraged to learn from the text, from literary theory and from class discussion. We shall study one story per class, which may require 2-3 hours of reading each week. Volunteers may be asked to present brief “bios” of our authors.

Our syllabus includes:  “Hair Jewelry” by Margaret Atwood, “The Tryst” by Joyce Carole Oates, “The Country Husband” by John Cheever, “Nomad and Viper” by Amos Oz, and “The Adulterous Woman” by Albert Camus

Books and Other Resources: 

All stories appear in a Penguin paperback anthology, The Art of the Tale, edited by Daniel Halpern (ISBN: 01400.79491). Available by order in bookstores and on the Internet.

Biography:

Bette Lehman, a teacher and professional seminar leader, has been lecturing, designing courses and leading book discussion groups in the greater Boston area for more than 25 years. She has taught at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education for 10 years.  In the 1990’s she founded Reading Between the Lines, an independent organization which created study groups devoted to reading and discussing works of classic and contemporary fiction. She has lectured in book stores and at public libraries and led study groups at LLARC, Regis College, and BOLLI. Bette holds both B.A. and M.A. Degrees in English Literature.

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3Thu-3A-5b:  Philip Roth: The Historical Dimensions of his Literature

Course Leader:  Carole Levy

Course Length/Start:  Now a second-half 5-week course starting April 6

Course Description:

Although he hasn’t yet received his Nobel Prize, Philip Roth has been a prodigious writer of the American Scene since the 1950’s when he began as a short story writer and then brought shock and horror to the traditional Jewish mother in the 1960’s with his novel Portnoy’s Complaint. We will look at five of his novels to discuss them as literature and as fictionalized accounts of events (or might-have-been-events) in American history. Roth came from a middle-class Newark, New Jersey Jewish family which has informed much of his viewpoint on American culture, politics and identity. One of the themes we will examine is the good intentions of mid-century liberalism and the social turmoil that has been its outcome. The course will also include some films made from the books and our judgement as to how faithful they are to the literature of the original. The time the assignments take depends on your reading speed. Computers are necessary to receive supplementary material such as literary reviews.

Books and Other Resources (updated reading list): 

Philip Roth: Portnoy’s Complaint, Goodbye Columbus, The Plot Against America, The Counterlife

Biography:

Now that I have the time after working more than twenty-five years as a high school teacher of English and raising three daughters, I enjoy leading classes of adults at LLAIC in subjects that I find interesting, and that I think will interest others. I enjoy the study of literature and history especially when that involves the writing of such an astute observer of American culture and issues of identity as Philip Roth. Previous courses I have led include a history of US health care policy and, as I had lived in Israel for thirteen years, courses on Israeli literature and history.  I have a B.A. from Penn State University and an MBA in management of not-for-profit organizations from the Heller School at Brandeis University. I enjoy playing tennis, x-country skiing and yoga, spending time with my six grandchildren … and reading good books of both literature and history.


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1Tue-1A-10:  Beyond IQ and Talent: Grit and Emotional Intelligence

Course Leader:  Mary and Richard Mansfield

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28

Course Description:

Why do many people excel in school and college and yet demonstrate only moderate effectiveness in their jobs and other life activities? Why do the people who rise to the top of organizations often have mediocre academic records? What skills enable individuals to be highly effective in their communities and volunteer organizations?

In this course, we plan to explore the "soft skills" for effectiveness, to understand why they are important, how they are demonstrated, how they can be developed, and what happens when they are missing. We will consider the implications of these skills in our every-day and interpersonal relationships, and will ask class participants to draw on their own life experiences where they have observed, and demonstrated the "soft skills" we are learning about.  We will read and discuss two books on this topic: Working with Emotional Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman; and Grit, by Angela Duckworth. In addition, we will ask class members to look for these skills when they are speaking with friends, watching the news, or reading magazines, and newspapers. The course leaders will use a variety of teaching methods including short presentations, small and large group discussions, and short video clips. Assignments should take approximately two hours per week, and basic computer skills are needed.

Books and Other Resources: 

Angela Duckworth. Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. N.Y.: Scribner, 2016.
Daniel Goleman. Working with Emotional Intelligence. N.Y.: Bantam Books, 1998.

Biography:

Richard and Mary have taught courses individually and together at LLAIC. As a consultant, Richard has specialized in the identification, assessment and development of workplace competencies, including ones related to grit and emotional intelligence. Mary, at one point in her career, worked as an individual career counselor, helping people to identify their competencies and present them to potential employers. Later, as an educational consultant, she helped teens and young adults to understand and present their competencies when applying to colleges.


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2Wed-1C-5a:  Writing a Memoir: Continuing the Story 

Course Leader:  Carole McNamee

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting March 1 (first half)

Course Description:

This is a continuing class for those who have already taken a course in memoir writing (anytime and anywhere.)  We will review the elements unique to memoir writing and whether we write for children, grandchildren, family, friends, or a wider audience, we will share our stories with one another.  These stories can amuse, bemuse, and offer “aha moments” with a richness that only you as the experiencer can provide.  Bring an openness to exploring your life experiences, a willingness to share your experiences with others, and an ability to witness the sharing of others.  Weekly reading and writing are expected, and it is estimated to take 1-2 hours a week. 

Books and Other Resources: 

Zinsser, William. (2004).  Writing About Your Life: A Journey into the Past. Marlowe & Company. New York.

Biography:

Carole McNamee has recently retired from two careers: the first, a professor of computer science and the second, a marriage and family therapist with a specialization in the therapeutic use of the creative arts.  Carole has written extensively on the therapeutic uses of the expressive arts and has facilitated groups using creative expression at the Friends General Conference annual gathering, the Friends Conference on Religion and Psychology (FCRP) and the Washington FCRP annual meetings as well as Round Oaks Creative Center in Charlottesville, VA, and Warm Hearth Retirement Village in Blacksburg, VA as well as at LLAIC last spring and fall.  Carole founded and directed the Willowbank Creative Center also in Blacksburg, VA. All of these activities have focused on personal experience as a touchstone for individual learning.


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1Tue-2B-10:  Great Decisions +2

Course Leader:  Marty Nichols

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28

Course Description:

Do you finish reading, listening to or watching the latest news wishing that you had a better understanding of the critical global issues facing our country?  If so, you are invited to participate in a Great Decisions discussion group. This is America’s largest discussion program on world affairs and is sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association. This will not be a lecture course.  Background material for each topic will be provided by essays in a briefing book to be read before class and by DVD presentations that we shall watch together at the beginning of each session. Class members are expected to participate in lively discussions facilitated by the class leader. These are the 8 issues that comprise the 2017 Great Decisions program:
•    The Future of Europe
•    Trade and Politics
•    Conflict in the South China Sea
•    Saudi Arabia in Transition
•    U.S. Foreign Policy and Petroleum
•    Latin America’s Political Pendulum
•    Prospects for Afghanistan and Pakistan
•    Nuclear Security
We will cover one topic per class session. The 9th and 10th classes will be devoted to study and discussion of a timely foreign policy issue selected by the class leader. Background reading from print and online magazines will be provided via email attachments in Word document or pdf format.

Biography:

I did my undergraduate study at Yale and took my graduate dental degree at Harvard. I was an Army dentist for two years and then spent the rest of my working life in private practice in suburban Boston. I have been involved with lifetime learning programs and have been a member and frequent facilitator of a Great Decisions group for many years. At LLAIC I have been a co-leader of courses on Contemporary Short Stories and Contemporary Challenges.


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1Tue-2C-5a
:
  Shakespeare, Opera, and Ballet:  Transforming One Art Form into Another


Course Leader:  Lois Novotny

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting Feb. 28 (first half)

Course Description:

Celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death by exploring how his works have been transformed into other art forms for the theater.  We’ll consider the changes made in creating operas and ballets based on some of his best-known plays.  After an introduction, each week will focus on a single work, and a large part of each class will be spent watching segments of stellar performances of the operas and ballets on DVDs.  No prior knowledge of music, opera, or ballet is required. The course will provide a general introduction to the nature of opera and ballet, and the kinds of changes that are involved in turning a play into an opera or ballet. The first work we’ll look at is Balanchine’s Midsummer’s Night Dream ballet, to music by Mendelssohn, followed by Verdi’s Otello, Verdi’s Macbeth, Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, Macmillan choreography, and finally Verdi’s Falstaff, based on The Merry Wives of Windsor. I will provide a synopsis of each play and hope that students will be able to look at it before class. Computer knowledge is not required.

Biography:

Lois Novotny completed doctoral work for a Ph.D. in musicology before the realities of the academic marketplace led her to law school.  She has attended opera and ballet in her native New York for many years, returning there since her relocation to Boston to attend performances at the Met, as well as performances at many of the great opera houses of Europe, including La Scala, La Fenice, and the Mariinsky and Bolshoi theaters. 


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1Tue-2A-10:  More From The Book of Genesis

Course Leader:  Rabbi Robert Orkand

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28 

Course Description:

This course focuses on the first book of the Bible (in both the Jewish and Christians canons), and is a continuation of the Fall semester class.  However, participation in the first class is not necessary for this second semester. 

Genesis is an extremely rich text that can be approached from a variety of perspectives, including literary, historical, theological, and archaeological. Most of the stories in Genesis are very familiar, but many crucial issues in the study of the book are less familiar to general audiences.

The course will speak to the different perspectives listed above.  First and foremost, we will approach the text as a piece of literature, highlighting the many literary devices and techniques employed by the ancient author(s) of the book. In the process, we will learn that literature played a central role in the life of ancient Israel.

We will talk about the history that lies behind the book of Genesis. In addition, we will delve into theological issues:  Did the ancient Israelites believe in one God?   Most importantly, we will deal with questions of authorship.  Is the book the result of a haphazard compilation of disparate sources? Or does it present itself as a unified literary whole, suggesting a single author?

Finally, we will explore topics that emanate from our reading of Genesis.  For example, we will explore the question of women in the Bible.

This course will be a combination of lecture and discussion.  Readings will be provided.

Books and Other Resources: 

Any version of the Bible

Biography:

Rabbi Robert Orkand served as a pulpit rabbi from 1973 to 2013 when he retired.  He and his wife moved to the Boston area to be near grandchildren, and the move has afforded him the opportunity to teach adults in a variety of settings, including LLAIC where he has taught comparative religions in several different classes.


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1Tue-1B-10:  Moving Through this Life as a Woman, Man or a Variation on the Theme
(Not being given this semester)
 
Course Leader:  Alorie Parkhill

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting Feb. 28 

Course Description:

Andi Zeisler writes: “There is a very fine line between celebrating feminism and co-opting it.” My two recent classes on the history and literature of feminism have made me keenly aware of how inter-connected everything is and how much more there is yet to explore. This course is open to everyone and requires no specific background other than a willingness to probe deeply into issues that face us all: personal identity, role stereotypes, sexuality, ageism and more. While the emphasis will be on feminism, the issues concern us all. During and since the recent campaigns, much has been written about misogyny, women’s rights and women in or out of power. These things are all shaping our world, and with a new administration, women’s issues will be very much at the forefront. Will we go backward? Many of the earlier aspects of feminism seem to have been coopted by the market and various politicians. Whole groups of people have been left out. Women’s control over their bodies is at high risk. This class will, in part, be driven by issues as they arise in the news daily. Individuals in the class will give reports on events as they unfold and perhaps lead some discussions. We will try to decide what we want the fourth wave of Feminism to be and how we can make that happen. Assignments will take one to two hours, depending on how much time class members choose to put into them. Everyone will be expected to be able to open attachments in emails.

Books and Other Resources: 

We Were Feminists Once (From RIOT GRRRL to Cover Girl, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement), by Andi Zeisler, published by Public Affairs, a member of the Perseus Books Group, published in 2016. Available through Amazon and other book sellers

We will also use a number of articles published and yet to be published. These will be sent as attachments.

Biography:

  I am a teacher by trade and passion. I began early, writing and directing plays for children. My main teaching career took place at The Cambridge School of Weston over more than 40 years. I taught English as well as courses in myth and religion. After retirement, I continued to offer courses in various lifelong learning programs (Buddhism, Myths and Toni Morrison). I have taught Buddhism and Non-Fiction Writing (twice) and Feminism (twice) at LLAIC. I was one of the founders of LLAIC, where I continue to relish learning, together, with my classes.


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2Wed-1A-10:  Jews and French Film

Course Leader:  Judith Pinnolis

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1 

Course Description:

Jews have had a long, complex, and checkered relationship in France going back over a thousand years. The Ashkenazi Jewish community was decimated during the Holocaust, yet the Jewish community was rebuilt after the war and is currently one of the largest in the world. In addition, Sephardic Jews flooded into France from previously held French colonies and from other parts of the world. The unique community built in France from these two branches of Judaism will be examined through French language film. First we will examine the lighter side with some comedies such as Dad on the Run and Would I lie to you or The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob.  Then we will examine the French situation in WWII through French eyes in Au Revoir les Enfants and the remnants afterward in Madam Rosa. We will explore the relationships of Jews and Muslims in The Wedding Song and Monsieur Ibrahim. Finally, we will look at Jews examining/dealing with their Jewish identities and family relationships in Little Jerusalem and Rashevsky’s Tango. We will conclude the class with contemporary Judaism in a light vein with God is Great, I’m Not and end with a contemporary French film such as Duchess of Warsaw or Live and Become.  (All films are subject to availability).

This will be a participatory class with “back to back” sessions. Each week, the film class will take two time periods, one to watch the film or film clips and the next segment to discuss the film or film clips.  There are no prerequisites. Participants will be expected to be able to receive email and be able to open readings in PDF format. There may be up to 1 hour of reading a week before each film for context and to strengthen discussion. I will give attendees forms for taking notes during the film, should they wish to do so, for aiding in the discussion. 

Books and Other Resources: 

None. Readings will be sent to participants as PDF attachments.
Bring a pencil or pen to take notes on the film while watching the films during class session.

Biography:

Judith Pinnolis is a retired librarian and scholar who worked over 20 years at Brandeis University. She serves as an Adjunct Professor of Music in the School of Jewish Music at Hebrew College and also taught at the School of Sacred Music at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in NYC.  Judy led many film and music courses in the BOLLI program at Brandeis, and has previously led a LLAIC course in music history.


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2Wed-2C-10:  Writing a Memoir: One Story at a Time

Course Leader:  Myrna Rybezyk and Theo Koziol

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1 

Course Description:

Only you can tell your unique story.  Whether for children, grandchildren, family, friends, or a wider audience, our stories can amuse, bemuse, and offer “aha moments” with a richness that only you as the experiencer can provide. 

This class will introduce the memoir as a literary genre and quickly proceed to writing exercises in and out of class to facilitate the development of your own memoir.  Bring an openness to exploring your life experiences, a willingness to share your experiences with others, and an ability to witness the sharing of others. Computer use is not required, and class members may take whatever amount of time they choose for writing.

Books and Other Resources: 

Zinsser, William.  Writing About Your Life: A Journey into the Past. Marlowe & Company. New York (2004)


Biography:

Myrna Rybczyk graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music with a Bachelor of Music Degree, majoring in music therapy. She was a visiting therapist at McLean Hospital for five years and Assistant Director of Orchard Home for adolescent girls, a branch of the Home for Little Wanderers. She taught at Monadnock Regional High School, NH, and was Head of Music Therapy at Medfield State Hospital. After leaving MSH to raise her children, she began and continues teaching piano and guitar in her home. In the early 1980’s she founded the Millis Inter-Regional Peace Action Group, working with the MA Nuclear Weapons Freeze Movement. Since 2000, she has been Director of Music at the Church of Christ UCC in her hometown of Millis, MA

Theo Koziol presently works part-time as the Executive Director of the Bilingual Montessori School of Boston. She has had various roles at a number of child-care centers during her career. She was also Adjunct Faculty Instructor of Early Childhood Education at Urban College and Mass Bay Community College.

Both Theo and Myrna were members of the Memoir Writing class offered at LLAIC last semester; they both enjoyed it so much that they volunteered to repeat the curriculum as CLs.


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3Thu-3D-5b:  LILAC Players   (No charge,and does not count against the 20 course-week limit)
 

Course Leader:  Judie Strauss

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 6 (second half)

Course Description:

LILAC Players will meet the last five weeks of classes with the goal of presenting our plays during lunch on the last class day.  Members will use scripts, so no memorizing is involved. We will add props and costumes each week. There will be a selection of three short plays.  We always have fun reading, rehearsing, and bonding. 

Though this is listed as a course in this catalogue, there is no charge,and it does not count against your limit of 2 ten week equivalent courses. For more info contact Judie Shel at judieshel@verizon.net


Biography:

Judie Shel has always had an interest in the theater from the time she was 12 and saw Annie Get Your Gun. She majored in education and taught middle school, after which she got a Masters in Counseling and worked in social services. When any opportunity arose, she appeared in temple and community plays: Music Man, Hello Dolly, and also Guys and Dolls at her temple, where she was the producer. In addition to participating in almost all the BOLLI plays, she directed both at a local senior center. She directed Autumn Nocturne, a play by Verne Vance, last semester for LLAIC. She enjoys helping people become their characters and completely expressing themselves.

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3Thu-3C-5a:  Selected Hot Topics in Crime, Punishment, and Prevention

Course Leader:  Sandy Sherizen

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting March 2 (first half)

Course Description:

The purpose of this course is to raise awareness about various types of crimes, why they are committed, how they are punished, and ways they may be prevented.  We will learn about hot topics in crime.  That will include why some people become criminals while other become victims.  High-profile sub-topics will include cybercrime, white collar crime and the roles that race and class play in the criminal justice system. Classes are very interactive.  Questions and comments from the class are highly encouraged and will be discussed. Each session will start with an overview of the topics of the week and then a discussion on the questions provided for each topic. Questions will raise fundamental issues for you to discuss in class. We will discuss crime-related examples and see videos.

I encourage class members to volunteer for a 10-minute presentation on a topic of interest. I will provide suggestions on topics and various materials that are readily available. A computer is needed to receive emails about topics and announcements. I will suggest readings for supplementary information and provide articles from academic literature, think tank papers and the popular press. Assignments will take two to three hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

I will produce, at cost, a selection of readings of informative articles and/or reports for each of the five weeks. For example, these can include discussions among experts or a high-level analysis of a specific issue. These may be executive summaries or highlights of policy papers from think tanks, including government agencies. For those who wish to explore a topic in greater detail, I can provide additional supplementary materials, including textbooks and/or fiction literature.

Biography:

Trained as a sociologist, I then went bad and became a criminologist and then really bad by becoming a computer security and privacy professional. I have taught at various universities, led seminars, appeared on a number of media programs and given speeches in many settings around the world.

Flunking retirement, I volunteered to teach ESL to adult immigrants and serve on a patient research ethics and safety board at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. I have taught lifelong learning courses on Your Privacy is at Risk, The Sociology of “Deviant” Behaviors and Surviving the Inquisition: Marranos/Crypto Jews/ Conversos. I am active in my synagogue, Beth El of Sudbury,


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3Thu-1A-10:  Comedy: Laughter on Film

Course Leader:  Irwin Silver

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2 

Course Description:

The iconic Maya Angelou said, “I don’t trust anyone who doesn’t laugh.” Hollywood has produced many films that are designed to make you both laugh and think. In this course, we will watch and discuss films chosen from the many genres of comedy. Many of these movies are timeless and memorable, from some of the greatest directors and actors in film history. They include directors such as Mike Nichols, Mel Brooks and Billy Wilder, and actors like Gene Wilder, Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Robert DeNiro, Barbra Streisand and Peter Sellers. The movies will provide different genres of comedy such as parody, lampoon, romance, and slapstick. Some of the films are The Producers, Animal House, Best in Show, and The Graduate. To quote the celebrated poet Robert Frost,  “If we couldn’t laugh we would all go insane.”  I will be forwarding information about the films and YouTube videos via email. Preparation time should be approximately one hour a week. 


Biography: 

The Course Leader is a graduate of Northeastern University with a Bachelor of Science degree. He spent 46 years in the investment industry with a national investment firm, retiring as a First Vice President-Investments. In addition to his career in investments he taught as an adjunct professor at Northeastern University. He has also devoted a lot of time as a volunteer for several charitable organizations and political campaigns. He was an avid skier in his younger days.


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2Wed-3C-10:  Hamilton

Course Leader:  Marvin Snider

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1

Course Description:

Hamilton had a multi-dimensional, dynamic personality: He was honest, charming, persuasive, vain, arrogant, uncompromising, creative and had a talent for self expression. His energy, passion, and creativity put him in a class with Benjamin Franklin and Teddy Roosevelt. What made it possible for Hamilton to have his amazing career? How did an orphan boy born in the Caribbean get educated in New York City and become an accomplished lawyer? We will look at the unique relationship between Washington and Hamilton, given a twenty-four year difference in their ages, when he was aide-de-camp in war and when their relationship continued into Washington’s presidency. Would the country have survived its infancy without Hamilton’s contribution as Treasury Secretary? His intellect, energy and intense personality had its negative side in contentious relationships with Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Burr. How did his conflict with Jefferson eventually set the foundation for what ultimately became the Republican and Democratic parties? Are you intrigued by why Hamilton's would put at risk his reputation for exemplary moral character by succumbing to his lust for a married woman, over an extended period, while professing devotion to his loving and supportive wife and their seven children? It also striking to see how the balance between Washington’s sound judgment and Hamilton’s impulsiveness contributed to what they accomplished together. This becomes evident when Hamilton’s successes diminish without the tempering hand of Washington after the end of his presidency. We will seek to understand his motives leading to the duel that ended his life. The course will end with listening to the music of Hamilton's Broadway play.

Assignments may take several hours, and ability to use email is important.

Books and Other Resources: 

Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton, Penguin Books, 2005.

Biography:

Marvin Snider has a PhD in psychology and has practiced both as a clinician and an organizational consultant. He has led many courses on diverse topics at the Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement - they included courses on International Hot Spots, Innovators of Political Thought, Cults, Elections, George Washington-The Indispensable Man, Lincoln, Benjamin Franklin and Teddy Roosevelt. These courses on founders are approached with emphasis on understanding the individual's personality, accomplishments, and motivations, and his or her impact on the country.


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2Wed-3A-10:  How to Develop a Vibrant/Productive American Economy

Course Leader:  Harriet Janel-Starrett

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 1 

Course Description:

This class will be a combined study of world economics, American possibilities, and the capabilities of a vibrant society.   We will look at economic strategies for the USA which could increase prosperity, employment, and opportunity.  "Isms" are not as important as what has historically worked and why it worked.  We will read the opinions and analysis of folks like Robert Reich (who wants to save capitalism), Joseph Stiglitz (who is more political), and Mitt Romney (who has lots of ideas and experience). This is a discussion course with some lecturing to teach terminology and the interpretation of data. The class should be very timely as the US begins the Trump Administration. Students will have about 1.5 hours of homework per week, and they will need to use a computer to receive and download articles sent as email attachments.

Books and Other Resources: 

The CL is reviewing possible books. TBD

Biography:

The Course Leader has graduate degrees in economic history, and business.  Prior to a business career she was a college (Northeastern), and high school teacher. Her business career began in international consulting with a major firm, working for businesses worldwide. The thrust of the work involved assisting businesses in deciding what products/markets to develop, and what their level of investment should be (strategic planning). Following international consulting, the CL was a director/officer/manager in a number of large companies in the defense, telecommunications, finance, and hospitality industries. She has taught many courses for LLAIC and other lifelong learning programs, mainly in the areas of history and economics.


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1Tue-2D-5b
:
  Reconstruction (1865-1877): Its Legacy in Our Time


Course Leader:  Joanne Tuck

Course Length/Start:  5-week course starting April 4 (second half)

Course Description:

A common expression frequently stated: “The North won the war but the South won the peace.”

The era of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War was fraught with immense challenges, intense debates and significant violence. Slavery had been abolished, and the status of former slaves brought drastic changes to their lives and to the Southern culture. Equality needed definition and protection under the law.  The South had to rebuild its economy and social structure and re-enter the union.  The struggles of the federal government to deal with the complex concerns of the day were exacerbated by the polarized visions of the Congress and President Andrew Johnson. These struggles and concerns had profound ramifications for the course of our history: amendments, extreme violence, Jim Crow laws, segregation, racism and injustice. We shall explore these policies and attitudes and their lingering effects on our society today. It is recommended that class members be able to open videos on YouTube, download pdf documents sent by me or other members, and be able to communicate via email. The readings and watching of videos occasionally will probably take a maximum of 2 hours a week.

Books and Other Resources: 

Farrow, Anne; Lang, Joel and Frank, Jenifer. Complicity. Ballantine Books, New York: 2006.
Foner, Eric. A Short History of Reconstruction, 1863-1877. Updated Edition. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, New York: 2015.

(I shall supplement with handouts and a suggested reading list.)

Biography:

I taught this course in the fall term, 2016, and found it to be well received.  In light of our present political situation, the Reconstruction course is more relevant than ever, illustrating the fragility of our democracy.
               
I taught at Wentworth Institute of Technology for many years.  I received degrees from B.U. in History and Social Education and studied the Holocaust and Civil Rights extensively at Facing History.  I had brought Facing History to Wentworth in 1983 and in 2012 I completed my most important work: “An Educator’s Legacy: Reflections of Teaching Facing History” and the 25-year study “The Long Term Impact of the Facing History and Ourselves - Elective Course at Wentworth Institute of Technology.”  I found my teaching experience at LLAIC this fall to be very rewarding and I am happy to continue with what I hope will be another successful semester of learning and exploration of our past and its impact on the present.


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3Thu-2D-10:  Anna Karenina

Course Leader:  Lois Ziegelman

Course Length/Start:  10-week course starting March 2

Course Description:

Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina is considered to be one of the greatest—some would insist the greatest—novel ever written. Ostensibly about a tragic romance, its scope is much larger, encompassing the total canvas of late 19th century society and its political, economic and social concerns. Above all, it focuses on morality in an exploration of the difference between the way we live and the way we ought to live. Computer ability is not needed. Reading should take approximately two hours.

Books and Other Resources: 

Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy. 

I use the Maude translation, but any translation, except Constance Garnett, is acceptable. The edition I use is the Norton Critical Edition, which is especially created for college teachers, so I wouldn’t expect anyone to own this. The Maude translation, however, is the standard one. Louise and Aylmer Maude were both disciples and friends of Tolstoy’s.

Biography:

I hold a Ph.D. from Brandeis and am Professor Emerita from Framingham State College where I taught World Literature and Drama for thirty-one years. I received five fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities. I have studied, taught and performed works ranging from Classical Antiquity through the 20th Century.


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Attached Files:  Course Descriptions (28 pages) – click on the file name below to view or print; click on the down-arrow to the far right of the file name to download (you may have to scroll over to see it).



Page updated Feb. 17, 2017

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Peter Schmidt,
Jan 9, 2017, 3:21 AM
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