Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions - Spring 2021

All courses will be conducted on Zoom.

Course descriptions are presented in alphabetical order by Course Leader (CL) last name.

Course Day and Time:  To find out when a course is being given, click on Course Schedule here or at the end of any course description.

Course codes also contain the day, period and course length information:

  • 1Tue, 2Wed, 3Thu designate the day the course is given (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, respectively);
  • In the middle field, 1, 2 or 3 stands for the period in which the course is given on that day;
  • In the rightmost field, 10, 8, 7, 6 and 5 stand for the course length in weeks; 5a or 5b means that the 5-week course is given in the first or second half of the semester, respectively.
Printable file of the Course List and Course Descriptions

In the course-list table below, click on the CL name to go to that course description. For a printable file of this list (2 pages), click here.

For a printable file of all the course descriptions, (28 pages) click here.

Course Leader
Course Title
 Course Code
Rachel Alpert
A Guided Tour Through Joyce's Ulysses - Part 2
2Wed-2C-10
Rachel Alpert
Rise of Religion in the Supreme Court
1Tue-3D-6a
Suzanne Art
More Art Luminaries: Five Superstars of the Art World
3Thu-1B-10
Harry Ball
Introduction to Your SLR Camera
3Thu-3B-5b
Don Bermont
From Turmoil To Transformation
1Tue-1E-8a
Ivy Cubell
Photography and Painting - A Sibling Rivalry in Focus
3Thu-2C-5a
Alice Freedman and Mary Mansfield
Going To The Dogs -The History of Domestication and Other Canine Tails
3Thu-1C-8a
Len Glassman and Jessica Bethoney
Great Decisions 2021
3Thu-3C-8a
Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan
Mixed Doubles and Other Dynamic Duos in Crime
3Thu-2B-10
Joel Kamer
A Romp Through the History of Mathematics
[Not being given this semester]
1Tue-2A-10
Bonnie Lass
Contemporary Memoirs
1Tue-2C-8a
Claire Levovsky
From Page to Screen: Books Made Into Movies
1Tue-3B-8a
Sheldon Lowenthal
Waves of Technology and Human Outcomes
1Tue-1C-10
Sheldon Lowenthal How Computers Work
[Not being given this semester]
 2Wed-2D-5b
Richard and Mary Mansfield
Political Polarization in America Today
2Wed-1A-10
David Mirsky
My Five Favorite Psychiatric Obsessions
3Thu-3D-5a
Lois Novotny
Opera's Fallen Ladies and Bad Girls
1Tue-2B-5b
Rabbi Bob Orkand
Jewish History and Humor
1Tue-3A-10
Judy Pinnolis
Modern Jewish Music
3Thu-1A-8a
Phillip Radoff
A Guided Tour of Mozart's Cosi Fan Tutte
[Not being given this semester]
2Wed-1C-5a
Gerry Rovner
Immigration Information: The Basics and Beyond
2Wed-1D-5b
Myrna Rybczyk
Memoir Writing: One Story At A Time
2Wed-1B-10
Beth Sanders
Looking Together at Mythmakers:  Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington
1Tue-1D-5a
Judith Scott
Famous American Artists
2Wed-2A-5a
2Wed-2B-5b
Sandy Sherizen
Where Has Privacy Gone and Why Is It Important For You
1Tue-1B-5b
Michael Singer
Is Aging A Disease? Untangling the Relationship 1Tue-1A-5a
Marvin Snider
Golda Meir, Extraordinaire (Period 1)
Golda Meir, Extraordinaire (Period 2)
3Thu-1D-8a
3Thu-2A-8a
Paula Silver and Roseli Weiss
LILAC Players  (No course fee)
2Wed-3A-5b
Jeffrey Zupan
The Joy of Birding
1Tue-3C-5b


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2Wed-2C-10: A Guided Tour Through James Joyce’s Ulysses – Part 2

Course Leader: Rachel Alpert

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 3

Course Description:

James Joyce’s Ulysses is widely celebrated as one of the great masterpieces of Twentieth Century literature. Its indelible characters, epic themes, intimate realism, imaginative style, poetic prose, and unparalleled literary connections present a unique reading experience. The book, at 730 pages, is, however, a daunting read, unguided. Though the entire novel covers one day –June 16, 1904—in the Dublin life of its three protagonists, we will take a leisurely guided tour in two semesters through the emotional, cultural, spiritual, and psychological struggles of Leopold and Molly Bloom and Stephen Dedalus on the most “ordinariniest” of days.

New participants are welcome! Even though this course is Part 2 of a 20-week course, I will be more than happy to Zoom with new participants to bring them up to speed on the first 250 pages of the book.  

The format will remain primarily a guided discussion of each chapter. Students can anticipate approximately 2-3 hours of outside reading each week.

Books and Other Resources:

The Hans Walter Gabler edition of Ulysses is recommended since it has line numbers for easy reference in class. In addition, the Course Leader will provide explanatory materials for advance reading for each class.

Biography:

I taught high school English and currently teach at Suffolk Law School. I have led lifelong learning courses on “Freedom of Speech,” “The Rise of Religion in the Supreme Court,” “Sex, Gender, Bathrooms and the Supreme Court,” “The Regulation of Food in the U.S,” and on James Joyce’s Ulysses.  I am an avid fan of great literature, including Ulysses.

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1Tue-3D-6a: Rise of Religion in the Supreme Court

Course Leader: Rachel Alpert

Course Length/Start: 6 Weeks (Class time from 2:45 PM to 4:15 PM)

Course Description:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”  So starts our Bill of Rights. For over two centuries, those words, stated by Thomas Jefferson, built “a wall of separation between Church and State”. Over the past ten years, and increasingly so today, the U.S. Supreme Court has been more deferential to “religious liberty” than any Supreme Court in U.S. history.  The Court has expanded “religious liberty” into many secular areas such as health care, tax credits for religious schools, exemption from employment discrimination laws, LGBTQ rights, and now covid restrictions. This six-session course will explore the expanding trajectory of “freedom of religion” from the historical context to the future.

The class will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Two hours of student preparation time per week will be average.

Books and Other Resources:

Links to articles will be provided.

Biography:

I teach at Suffolk Law School and have over 30 years’ experience as a lawyer.  I previously led a LLAIC study group on James Joyce’s Ulysses.  At Regis, I facilitated the following courses:  “Freedom of Speech,” “Sex, Gender, Bathrooms and the Supreme Court,” “The Regulation of Food in the U.S.,” and “The Rise of Religion in the Supreme Court.”

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3Thu-1B-10: More Luminaries of the Art World

Course Leader: Suzanne Art

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

We will study the lives and works of John Singer Sargent, Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, Andrew Wyeth, and David Hockney. Each of these artists is recognized as a master in the art world of his or her times. Sargent was a virtuoso of the traditional approach to oil painting embraced by the famous École des Beaux Arts in Paris, but his spontaneous brushstrokes and alla prima technique added a modern flair to his portraits. Georgia O’Keeffe was at heart an abstract painter, who forged a unique style that blended realism with fantasy. Edward Hopper studied art with Robert Henri, but he turned away from the credo of the evolving Ashcan School to depict scenes of American life that reflected his more introverted view of the world. Andrew Wyeth, son of acclaimed illustrator N.C. Wyeth, mastered the mediums of tempera and drybrush to paint in nearly photographic detail the ordinary people and landscapes of Chadd’s Ford, Pennsylvania and Cushing, Maine. Yet, there is a surrealistic side to his paintings. David Hockney participated in the Pop Movement of the 1960s, then moved off in a multitude of new directions. Now 83, he continues to explore new vistas in a variety of mediums. In this course, we will analyze the major works of these artists and discover how they reflect and/or respond to the trending art movements of their times.

There will be a combination of presentation and class discussion. Weekly class preparation will average about 1.5 hours.

Books and Other Resources:

All assignments will be online. These will include short biographies and videos of specific paintings, art movements, and recent exhibitions.

Biography:

I have always loved art and history. My favorite pastime is “experiencing” the paintings in art museums. I have a BA in history, an MA in the French language and literature, and an MA in teaching. I taught history for 16 years at a private school. During that time, I also wrote a series of twelve history books, a major feature of which is the study of the art of a given culture. I have taught many art history courses at LLAIC. I taught this course in the fall of 2020.

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3Thu-3B-5b: Introduction to Your Digital SLR Camera

Course Leader: Harrison Ball

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 15

Course Description:

What is your photographic vision? Go beyond the automatic settings on your camera and learn how adjusting aperture, shutter speed and ISO can result in more creative images.  In five online Zoom classes, you will learn about RAW vs. JPEG images as well as balance, depth of field, exposure, and focusing. We will discuss the basics of compositions and how to express your artistic vision.  We will explore how to display your images through print and digital media. Finally, we will discuss various photographic genres including travel and street, landscape, family, event, flash, macro, and low light photography. The choice of which genres to discuss will be based on participant input since they all cannot be covered in the time allotted. Post-processing will be introduced during the course but will not be a major part of this program.

The classes will use lectures and discussion of participants' images. Several assignments to demonstrate principles discussed in class will be assigned to each participant and will require from 1-3 hours to complete. Participants will submit images from their assignment for a class at least one day prior to the class. These images will be uploaded each week and will be the basis for class discussion. In addition to the Zoom classes, I will be available via e-mail to discuss problems and expand on individual issues and concerns.

Books and Other Resources:

McHugh, Sean T., Understanding Photography: Master Your Digital Camera and Capture that Perfect Photo, no starch press, 2019 (https://www.cambridgeincolour.com/books/understanding-photography-v2/)

Biography:

I am a retired physician and ardent amateur photographer. I initially started shooting with film including color developing and printing more than 40 years ago and then switched to digital about 22 years ago. I consider myself a general photographer and enjoy family, event, travel, street, landscape, and macro photography. I am a member of Gateway Camera Club (Framingham).  Some of my images can be viewed on Flickr (harryb3md) and SmugMug (www.hballphoto.com).

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1Tue-1E-8a: From Turmoil to Transformation

Course Leader: Don Bermont

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

Why, with so many exciting new developments in communication, travel, education, medicine, genetics, robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and other scientific and technological advances, are so many people suffering from anxiety and confusion?  Why are so many people, especially older people, unsettled, angry, and mistrustful?  The explanation can be found by examining the basic conditions of life on Earth. We will do that in this course.

The planet Earth is unique in how hospitable it has been in support of so many forms of life. But, upon closer examination, Mother Earth is a harsh hostess. Ninety-nine percent of everything that ever lived on Earth is now gone; extinct. For every surviving species, including humans, life has always been a constant challenge. Each individual, of every species, has to develop the skills necessary to grow, eat, protect, and reproduce themselves. Survival depends upon how well those skills are learned.

But now, for humans, many of their skills are not meeting their needs as effectively as they have for millennia.  Suddenly, due to rapid changes in technology, humans have developed totally new ways to grow, eat, protect, and reproduce themselves.  This is resulting in turmoil and disruptions in the economic, political, and social systems all over the world. Some people are embracing and extolling these changes while others are fiercely opposing and resisting them. Most people remain confused, frightened, and, uninformed. Many have been intentionally misinformed. However, these changes are transformative and unstoppable. New skills will be necessary for our species to survive and thrive as we go through this difficult period of transformation.

What do you think?  We will discuss this for eight weeks.

Ideas will be presented and then discussed, followed by more ideas being presented and discussed.  The class members are encouraged to present their own ideas.

Books and Other Resources:

Two or three articles will be sent before each class to prepare everyone for the discussion.

Biography:

I have been teaching courses at LLAIC for several years.  I look forward to the class discussions.  I have always found them stimulating and enlightening.  In my previous years I ran a Psychology practice in Lowell, MA.  Now, besides participating in LLAIC I chase my grandchildren while wearing a mask, I root for the Celtics, and I cook for my wife.

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3Thu-2C-5a: Photography and Painting: A Sibling Rivalry in Focus

Course Leader: Ivy Cubell

Course Length/Start: 5 Weeks starting March 4

Course Description:

“From now on, painting is dead!” exclaimed French painter Paul Delaroche upon seeing the first photograph in 1839. Before photography, painters had the sole role in visually recording the world. With the camera taking over that role with such clarity of detail, most innovative painters felt free to experiment and break away from traditional representation --- to seek new qualities in painting ---- and, voila, all the “isms” were born! This course will explore the fascinating history of photography, from daguerreotypes through the digital age. We will also reflect on the continual push-pull relationship between photography and painting and the ways the two arts have influenced each other over the last 150 years. 

Each session of this 5-week course will be a combination of striking visual presentations with accompanying lecture, followed by lively interaction as we apply some well-established frameworks to analyzing individual photographs and paintings. “You don't take a photograph, you make it.” -- Ansel Adams

Books and Other Resources:

Optional reading resources will be suggested.

Biography:

I am passionate about art and history and making connections between the two in dynamic and thought-provoking ways.  As a Gallery Instructor since 2002 at the MFA Boston and former Vice-Chair of the Gallery Instructor advisory board, I lead specially themed tours through the various collections and special exhibitions for both student and adult groups, develop tours and training curricula for MFA docents, and lead professional development teacher workshops for schools throughout New England.  In addition to my degree in Art History from University of Michigan and Columbia University, I hold an MSW and a JD from Boston University. 

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3Thu-1C-8a:  Going to the Dogs: The History of Domestication and Other Canine Tails

Course Leader: Alice Freedman and Mary Mansfield

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

Did you know that Cairo, a Belgian Malinois dog, was the “soldier” who found the hidden bin Laden? Did you know that dogs can detect the corona virus, an oncoming seizure, and bombs planted six feet below the ground? Do you know that dogs can express empathy and “read” our gestures better than chimpanzees, our closest genetic relative? 

Dogs, often called “man’s best friend,” are one of the most unusual and special creatures.  If you wondered how they transitioned from wolves, got domesticated, were valued and treated throughout the ages and in different cultures, developed into many breeds, serve as great helpers to humans, and function in the military, this is the course for you! If you aren’t already in love with dogs, this is also the course for you! You will learn what is so unique and wonderful about them and marvel at their intelligence.

Books and Other Resources:

None

Biography:

Alice Freedman: I have been a class leader at LLAIC for two courses that I’ve presented twice each: “Selected Novels of Ian McEwan” and “Novellas:  The Short and Sweet or Not So Sweet.” As a board member of LLAIC, I am also on the Curriculum Committee and manage the Summer Program.  I started my career as a high school English teacher.  After receiving an MA degree in counseling psychology, I became an Organizational Development and Learning Consultant for Harvard Vanguard Medical Association.  As a workshop designer and facilitator, I managed the Seminar Program for Work/Family Directions and then Ceridian Corporation.

Mary Mansfield: I have taught and co-taught several courses at LLAIC. I’ve had careers in elementary education, psychology of reading, college admissions, career counseling, and educational consulting where I had the opportunity to run workshops and make many presentations. I’ve been active in the LLAIC community, serving on the board and chairing the Curriculum Committee.

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3Thu-3C-8a: Great Decisions 2021

Course Leader: Len Glassman and Jessica Bethoney

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

“Great Decisions” is a weekly discussion group exploring a different topic of foreign policy issues facing the USA.  Since it’s not a lecture, participation is encouraged, but not mandatory. Each week we will view a video that will either be shown in person or on YouTube. Additionally, there is a booklet that accompanies the course.

Most weekly assignment have about ten pages of reading.

Books and Other Resources:

There is a booklet for each specific “Great Decisions” course.  The 2021 version will be available before the course begins.

Biography: 

Len Glassman:  I’m a lifelong Bostonian and grew up in Brookline.  After graduating from Brookline High School, I received a BS in business from Northeastern University.  My graduate school degree was from the University of Hard Knocks!  For the next fifty years I worked for, then later owned and served as president of Hampden Automotive Sales Corp, a well-known manufacturer and distributor of automotive and truck parts. 

I’m interested in history, current events, and politics.  For fun, I own a boat, fish relentlessly, play pickleball, read, and play golf.  My wife and I have been married for fifty years and have two children and two grandchildren.  My wife and I presently own and operate The BIG FISH Project.  We sell t-shirts and baseball caps on the Internet to raise money for a number of worthwhile causes.

Jessica Bethoney:   I am a professor at Bunker Hill Community College, and have two masters’ degrees – one in intellectual history from Brandeis University and the other from Tufts University in counseling psychology.  Though officially retired from my full-time position, I continue to teach culturally related honors seminars at Bunker Hill Community.  I have also taught several courses which focused on understanding human behavior in different sociological and cultural contexts.at the lifelong learning programs at Brandeis and Regis Colleges.  Last semester I taught two courses at LLAIC.

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3Thu-2B-10: Mixed Doubles and Other Dynamic Duos in Crime

Course Leader: Sandy Grasfield and Dana Kaplan

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

Two heads are better than one, right? That’s especially true when it comes to solving the most puzzling crimes. We’ll look at five detective “teams” to see how the interplay of perspectives advances the plot and enhances the enjoyment of works by five very different, but very successful contemporary authors of mystery fiction. You’ll have two weeks to read each of the assigned books. Every other week, we will assign two or three short stories, mostly featuring a different “detective duo.”

This will be a highly interactive course, with short explanations, videos, author biographies and lots of time for lively discussion. Among the topics we expect to explore are the impact of differences in age, sex, class, race, ethnicity and other factors in unravelling the mystery. Expect the unexpected: when we say “mixed,” we mean, not your average Starsky and Hutch! And we’ll explore the many and varied answers the group has to the basic question “What IS a mystery novel and why do you love them?”

You can expect to spend 1 to 1.5 hours outside of class each week reading and watching short videos.

Books and Other Resources:

Charles Todd: A Test of Wills
Elizabeth George: Well-schooled in Murder
Dennis Lehane: Sacred
Michael Connelly: The Brass Verdict
Nicci French: Blue Monday

Biography:

Sandy Grasfield: I was a middle school librarian and media specialist for thirty years. I have taught several courses at LLAIC and elsewhere, including The History and Politics of Food, The Plays and Memoirs of Lillian Hellman, and Great Photographs and Photographers of the Depression Era.

Dana Kaplan: I had a varied career as a marketing and sales promotional writer and manager of creative teams. My focus was business-to-business. Among the companies I worked for were Honeywell, Digital Equipment Corporation, Duke Energy and PricewaterhouseCoopers. My greatest regret is not studying a history curriculum at university, and I have been making up for it since then.

Dana and Sandy have presented two successful courses focused on mystery novels. We also ran a monthly summer book group, “Food and Memories,” focused on culinary memoirs

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1Tue-2A-10: A Romp Through the History of Math   [Not being given this semester] 

Course Leader: Joel Kamer

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description: 

Romp: definition — to move in a brisk, easy, and playful manner. This course will move in a brisk manner as we have to cover 6,000 years in 10 weeks. It will be easy as there are no exams, nor will there be any mathematical proofs. Finally, we will adopt a playful attitude as we investigate what Plato had to do with Platonic solids, why the product of negative numbers is positive, what copulating rabbits have to do with mathematics, imaginary versus real numbers, when parallel lines meet, group theory without groupies, how can there be more than one infinity?, how a coffee cup is the same as a donut and the most elegant equation in mathematics. As a result of this romp through math, your grandchildren may forever be impressed and really believe you are 10,000 years old. The only background you need is a slight recollection of your high school mathematics. Come frolic with us.

Each class will consist of lecture/explication by the course leader with participation of the class members. Preparation time for reading and problem solving will be 1-2 hours per week.

Books and Other Resources:

The Math Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained, DK Publishing, 2019, ISBN: 978-1465480248

Biography: 

As a tyke I was taught reading, ‘riting, and ‘rithmetic. As you can see from the title of this course, I took a hankering to ‘rithmetic. After matriculating for a few degrees in mathematics, I decided to earn a living and became a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries. Retirement followed after a few decades practicing as an actuary, and now I’d like to share my enthusiasm for ‘rithmetic with others.

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1Tue-2C-8a: Contemporary Memoir

Course Leader: Bonnie Lass

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

Welcome to “Contemporary Memoir”! Through guided discussions, we will explore four recently published memoirs by women.  Discussions will include content summaries, author biographies and writing styles, published reviews and criticism and, most importantly, personal reactions.  Here are the books we’ll read, one every two weeks of this 8-week course.  I’ve annotated the list to include the primary theme/topic of each memoir.
  • Fierce Attachments, Vivian Gornick. Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 2005
    Hailed by the “New York Times” as the best memoir in the last 30 years, Fierce Attachments shifts back and forth from Gornick’s girlhood to adulthood as she writes about her fight for psychosocial independence from her remarkable mother.
  • Educated, Tara Westover.  Random House, 2018
    Tara Westover was born to survivalist Mormons in the mountains of Idaho and had no formal education—that is, until her quest for knowledge led to self-education, then to Harvard University and Cambridge University.  In this number-one bestseller, we learn how she negotiates this transformation, while both loosening and maintaining her family ties.
  • Year of the Monkey, Patti Smith. Knopf, 2019
    As Smith approaches her 70th birthday, a lifelong friend is dying. In grief, she takes to the road, traveling to revisit some of their haunts and stimulating dreams and memories that are revelatory, mystical, real, and imagined.

  • Yellow House, Sarah Broom.  Grove Press, 2019
    Winner of the National Book Award in 2019, The Yellow House is a memoir plus.  Not only does it tell the story of the author and her eleven siblings uprooted by Hurricane Katrina, but it also provides a tragic and inspiring portrait of black New Orleans.

Literary criticism, personal reaction, and additional content and author resources will be shared among the class members and Class Leader.   Student preparation will vary, since reading speeds vary.   

Books and Other Resources:

Literary criticism, personal reaction, and additional content and author resources will be shared among the class members and Class Leader.   Student preparation will vary, since reading speeds vary.  

Biography:

I was an educator/writer/editor for 47 years.  Now retired, I celebrate the freedom to indulge my old hobbies and develop new ones.  I love viewing art and making collages and mixed media canvases.  I’m a bit of a film buff and a rock and roller, but reading is my favorite sport, especially contemporary fiction and memoir.

I’ve been a member of LLAIC since its onset and have taught courses in Literary Memoir, The Blues, and Bob Dylan.  I also enjoy leading “New Yorker” stories discussion groups.  I have taught “Contemporary Memoir” during the Fall 2020 term and feel it works well in the Zoom format. 

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1Tue-3B-8a: From Page to Screen:  Books Made into Movies

Course Leader: Claire Levovsky

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

Stories are an essential part of every human culture; they help us make meaning and understand ourselves, each other, and our place in the world. The means by which these stories are told—whether they are written, spoken, or acted on stage or screen—influences the way we approach and interpret them. While film may be influenced by written work, it should always be considered an entirely unique piece of art for the purposes of critique and analysis. This course explores the complex interplay between film and literature. We will analyze selected novels in relation to their film versions in order to gain an understanding of the possibilities and problems.

The books we will read and their accompanying movies are:
  • Defending Jacob by William Landay — A novel about a Massachusetts assistant district attorney whose 14-year-old son is accused of murdering a classmate. This legal thriller was named one of the best books of the year.
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett — A novel set in 1960s Mississippi that gives the perspective of black maids caring for white families.  It’s both a NYT bestseller and Academy Award-winning film.
  • The Radium Girls by Kate Moore — True story of 1920s female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning while painting watch dials with self-luminous paint.  It also focuses on the fight for workers’ rights.  It’s a NYT and WSJ bestseller.
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot — The story of cell samples taken from a black woman who died of cervical cancer and how those cells led to many medical breakthroughs.  The medical community never asked for Lacks’ permission to use her cells in research.  It’s named one of the best books of the year.
All of the books are available at your library or on Amazon.  The films are available at the following providers:
  • Apple: Defending Jacob
  • Netflix: The Help and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • HBO: Radium Girls
The class will be a discussion, first of the book and then of the related film. An estimated two hours per week would be spent reading the books and watching the movies.

Books and Other Resources:

See the course description for the list of books and their authors

Biography:

I taught at Fisher College from 1992-2015, at the Taunton, New Bedford, and Brockton Hospital School of Nursing Campuses.  I have taught Expository Writing, Literature and the Critical Essay, Children’s Literature, Literature and Film, Ethics, The American Short Story, The American Novel, Introduction to Psychology, Business Communication, Public Speaking, and Themes in American Literature.  My background includes studies in Professional Writing, Rehabilitation Counseling, and Teaching, not only at the college level, but at the high school level as well.  I am Certified as a Rehabilitation Counselor and as a Secondary School Instructor.

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2Wed-2D-5b: How Computers Work   [Not being given this semester]

Course Leader: Shelly Lowenthal

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 14

Course Description:

We have all become dependent on computers in our daily lives. In this class, we will learn the history of computer technology and dive deep into how they work. Topics covered will include Boolean algebra, computer math, digital circuits, layered operating systems, programming, computer graphics, storage, and networking.

The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Website links that will aid our discussion will be sent before class. Expect to spend 1-2 hours per week in preparation.

Books and Other Resources:

Links to articles to be provided.

Biography:

I have degrees in Electrical Engineering from MIT and I have been developing products and managing large teams until 2015. I have created and delivered classes to managers to ensure high performance and to customers at trade shows. I have always enjoyed reading about technology and have personally experienced the waves of technology, including the development of computers,  in my personal work life.

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1Tue-1C-10: Waves of Technology and Human Outcomes

Course Leader: Shelly Lowenthal

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

Technology continues to improve the lives of humans.  For example, technology has changed the lives of our ancestors, from low life expectancy and lives of drudgery to the highest life expectancy with leisure consuming much of our time.  How did humans manage to go from hunting and gathering to feeding a very small population in good times and to feeding 7.5 billion people and their animals?  We will follow human wandering and dragging belongings, to the discovery of the wheel, sea faring, and the creation of mechanical machinery that allows for rapid movement.  We will follow the stages of computer improvements starting with the origins of math, to the abacus, and to today’s computers that fit into our pockets!  We will also discuss advances in language and communication, agriculture, transportation, energy, medicine, and more. 

Books and Other Resources:

None

Biography:

I have degrees in Electrical Engineering from MIT and have been developing products and managing large teams until 2015.  I have created and delivered classes to managers to ensure high performance and to customers at trade shows. I have always enjoyed reading about technology and have personally experienced the waves of technology in my personal work life.

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2Wed-1A-10: Political Polarization in America Today

Course Leader: Mary and Richard Mansfield

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 3

Course Description:

We have all read or heard that America has become much more polarized, politically, over the course of our lifetimes.  It has become much more difficult for our elected representatives to compromise and work together to do the work of government.  How great is our political polarization?  How and why did it develop?  What are the possible roles of genes, personal identities, parental child-rearing values, moral values, education, and residence?  What, if anything, can be done about political polarization?

To help answer these questions, we will read and discuss two highly readable books by political psychologists.  Although there will be occasional brief presentations of key ideas from the readings and YouTube-clips relevant to political polarization, this will be primarily a discussion class.  We hope that you will participate actively in class discussions.

Plan to do about 65 pages or 1-2 hours of reading, on average, per week.  Your active class participation will be welcome.

Books and Other Resources:
  • Why We’re Polarized by Ezra Klein. Avid Reader Press. 2020. (required)
  • Prius or Pickup: How the Answers to Four Simple Questions Explain America’s Great Divide by Marc Hetherington and Jonathan Weiler. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. 2018. (required)
  • The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt. New York: Vintage books. 2013. (recommended)
Biography:

Richard and Mary Mansfield have co-taught several previous LLAIC courses: The American Dream in Crisis; The Case for Optimism; Beyond IQ and Talent; and American Education—the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Richard had one career as a university professor of developmental and educational psychology and a second and longer career as a consultant specializing in organizational and leadership assessment. Mary had careers in elementary education, psychology of reading, college admissions, career counseling, and educational consulting.

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3Thu-3D-5a: My Five Psychiatric Obsessions

Course Leader: David Mirsky

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

This course will focus on five topics that have been of great interest to me. The topics for the first three sessions are psychiatric diagnoses that continue to generate concern and controversy despite advances in their treatment.
  1. Autism and its less serious relative, Asperger’s syndrome, may involve mild to serious problems in interpersonal functioning.

  2. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can afflict many bright and gifted people and limit their ability to contribute to their fullest potential.  An ADHD diagnosis may rescue a child from stigmatizing, punitive responses but leave lifelong problems unaddressed.

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been attracting media interest and more federal money because of long overdue attention to the psychological scars of veterans of recent wars.  In addition, scarring trauma is an element of daily life, generating major mental health problems for countless people in domestic “battlefields”.

    The topics for the last two sessions are social concerns of many psychiatrists, their patients, and their patients’ families.

  4. The closing of mental hospitals—many of which provided “asylum” and protection, with the rarely materializing promise of community-based care.  This has shifted the burden of mental health care from the state to insurance providers, while preventive services in schools and community agencies remained underfunded.

  5. The perceived unpleasantness or undesirability of the “other” is a reminder of the “past” barbaric treatment of persecuted groups and of the mentally ill, who now comprise large segments of our prison population and the homeless.

The sessions will be primarily lecture and discussion.  No outside preparation required.

Books and Other Resources:

None

Biography:

A product of the South Bronx (see Ogden Nash; “The Bronx; No Thonks”) and educated at Bard College and Western Reserve School of Medicine, I pursued (an aborted) residency in neurology in New York and then spent two years in England, working for the National Health Service in two innovative psychiatric hospitals, Claybury and the Marlborough Day. As a medical student, I spent two summers at Charenton Hospital, the Parisian equivalent of Bellevue that has a long history of humane care for the “aliénés,“ as patients were called, and the last refuge of the Marquis de Sade (see Peter Brooks’ play, Marat Sade). I completed my adult and child psychiatry training in Boston and have spent the subsequent decades working in community mental health programs in Massachusetts and teaching in medical and nursing schools.  Mentors, colleagues, and patients have illuminated my path, along with the insights of Sigmund Freud, Dante Alighieri, Marcel Proust, Michel de Montaigne and, most recently, Bill Griffith (“Zippy” in the Boston Globe)—“outsiders” all, and exemplars of the compassionate life.

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1Tue-2B-5b: Opera’s Fallen Ladies and Bad Girls

Course Leader: Lois Novotny

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 13

Course Description:

Women behaving badly—or at least deviating from social norms-- are often featured in opera. The title of one of the best known, La Traviata, in fact means “the fallen woman.”

This course will look at some of the ladies viewed as fallen, some of whom are victims of circumstance or driven by love into situations that destroy them, as well as some who really are bad girls. We will watch longer excerpts, on DVDs, of five operas (Verdi’s La Traviata, Bizet’s Carmen, Massenet’s Thaïs, and Puccini’s Suor Angelica and La Rondine), looking at the heroine’s society and, how it treats her, her reactions, and her fate. We’ll also see smaller excerpts of other operas (sometimes only short clips or trailers if that’s all that’s available) dealing with similar subject matter, possibly Manon Lescaut, Marnie, Anna Nicole, Lulu, and Salome—the last two have been described as Carmen’s distant degenerate descendants! In some cases, we will look at different versions of the same opera, showing how different directors added their interpretation. We’ll also consider some of the men in these ladies’ lives—after all, they generally didn’t go astray alone!  And while these ladies, fallen or bad, are usually not happy, they express themselves in absolutely marvelous music

The majority of class time will be spent in looking at DVDs or video clips of the opera being discussed, after it has been introduced. This is not primarily a discussion course, but there should be some time each week to discuss impressions of the works presented. Preparation time will generally be reading the provided synopses of the operas. Where a libretto is available for the operas considered in more depth, it will also be provided but reading it in advance isn’t required, as all the operas shown will have subtitles. There may also be links to short articles or other short clips, especially for the more contemporary works.

Books and Other Resources:

No books. For each opera, a synopsis will be provided and, where available, a libretto for the operas considered in more depth will also be provided, but reading the libretto is not required. There may also be links to short articles or other short clips.

Biography:

After completing all course work for a Ph.D. in musicology, it became apparent that the job market for college teaching (the only work for which the degree was relevant) had completely ceased to exist. Since learning something that had a job and salary attached to it seemed like a good idea, I went to law school. I’ve enjoyed putting my undergraduate background in English literature and art, together with my graduate work, to good use in teaching several courses at LLAIC, ranging from opera to ballet to Jane Austen. 

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1Tue-3A-10: How Jewish Humor Mirrors Jewish History

Course Leader: Rabbi Robert Orkand

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

In every people and culture humor is a reflection of their history, status, and values. The same thing is true of the Jewish people. Humor serves as a clue to what Jews were experiencing and thinking about throughout their history. My goal is to view the history and culture of the Jews through this lens of humor. Because of the universal nature of the issues addressed by this humor, class participants will surely see themselves in the jokes and stories to be discussed.

The format of this class will be lecture with plenty of opportunity for questions and the occasional joke.

Books and Other Resources:

None

Biography:

I have been retired from the pulpit rabbinate since 2013, which has afforded me plenty of time to teach adult learning classes in a variety of settings and—pre-pandemic—to spend time with our grandchildren.

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3Thu-1A-8a: Close Listening: Masterpieces of Jewish music from the Modern Age

Course Leader: Judy Pinnolis

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

Jewish culture encompasses many art forms. Outside of established community expressions, such as synagogue music or folk cultures such as klezmer, Yiddish, or Ladino music, many Jews have attempted to give expression to Jewish identity through their art music. This eight-week course will examine closely some key masterworks of Jewish art music of the modern period. We will listen to particular art compositions from some Jewish composers and attempt to gain a greater understanding of the meanings of these works and their contexts. Selections for this course may include works such as Achron (Hebrew Melody), Saminsky (Schir Haschirim), Bloch (Suite Hebraique), Bernstein (Kaddish), Zeisl (Requiem Ebraico), Toch (Cantata of the Bitter Herbs), Gideon (Hound of Heaven), Waxman (Song of Terezin), and Warshauer (Symphony No. 1 Living Breathing Earth).

No prerequisites are necessary. Attendees do not need to be able to read music. Classes will include listening to music, discussions, brief readings that will be sent to attendees in advance each week, and clips of specific sections of music. Students will be asked to read some short articles and listen to music clips in advance, if possible. 

Books and Other Resources:

I will provide handouts by email attachment. You should be able to open a PDF file. Links for listening, if available online will be provided in advance.

Biography:

I’m the Associate Director, Berklee Library at the Berklee College of Music/Boston Conservatory. Prior to that I worked at Brandeis for over two decades. For over ten years, I’ve also taught Jewish musicology classes at Hebrew College. I write and publish research on Jewish music, with a particular emphasis on women’s contributions. If you want to see more about my work, feel free to visit my academia site: https://berklee.academia.edu/JudithPinnolis. This class will be a first for me in this area of Jewish music and I’m looking forward to your contributions!

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2Wed-1C-5a: A Guided Tour of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte   [Not being given this semester]

Course Leader: Phil Radoff

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on March 3

Course Description:

The course will examine in depth the third and last of the great operatic collaborations between Mozart and his most accomplished librettist, Lorenzo Da Ponte. The opera will be presented through several videos to enable students to see how different producers treated the same material. The course is intended to be of value to students unfamiliar with the opera, as well as to afford a greater appreciation of the opera to students already familiar with it. Students with no familiarity with opera may find the course a bit challenging, but should not find it overly taxing if they attend the classes and do the assignments — i.e., prepare for each class by watching or listening at home to the sections of the opera assigned for that class and by reading at home the corresponding portions of the libretto and other assigned material. (YouTube has at least two full-length versions of the opera with English subtitles available.) The material will build from week to week, and students should make every effort to attend all of the sessions.

This is a lecture/presentation course that will rely heavily on videos in the form of DVDs. There will be limited opportunity for discussion. Students should watch or listen to the assigned portion of the opera and read the corresponding portion of the libretto.  Perhaps
hours per week in preparation.

Books and Other Resources:

Students should have access to a complete version (audio or video) of the opera and the libretto in English and Italian.  These are available for purchase from the usual online book sellers and copies are also available from the Minuteman Library System.  Perhaps most importantly, a free version of the libretto and videos of the opera with English subtitles are available online.

Biography:

I have a Ph.D. in physics and worked as a physicist before switching to law. I worked as a lawyer in private practice, with the US Government, and as inside corporate counsel before retiring in 2004 as group vice president and general counsel with Raytheon. My wife Norma and I live in Wayland. I have been a LLAIC member since LLAIC’s inception. I have no formal musical training, but I’ve had a lifelong interest in opera and have led several opera courses and given lunchtime talks. I recently published a collection of short stories, and my one-act play, Locked In, was presented by the LILAC players last year.

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2Wed-1D-5b: Immigration Information: The Basics and Beyond

Course Leader: Gerry Rovner

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 14

Course Description:

The course will consist of equal parts lecture and class participation. We will start by examining the basics of immigration law and processing, what the various visa classifications are, and whether immigrants are a benefit or burden to the US. We will conclude with an examination of current myths about immigration. We will also examine the immigration policies of the Biden Administration. At the end of the course, you will not be able to practice immigration law, but you will surely be able to wow your friends at post-Covid cocktail parties!

Reading will be about 1 hour per week.

Books and Other Resources:

Links to article will be provided.

Biography:

I have practiced immigration law exclusively for over 40 years before retiring. I spent the majority of my career representing, guiding, and advising a wide range of clients on issues concerning immigrant and non-immigrant visas in business, student and family matters, and citizenship and consular issues. I have held leadership roles in a number of national and state immigration organizations and have frequently lectured on immigration law for national and local bar associations as well as local community groups. One of my proudest moments as an immigration attorney occurred when I delivered the keynote welcoming address to 302 new citizens at Faneuil Hall in 2017 at the invitation of the District Director of Citizenship and Immigration Services. 

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2Wed-1B-10: Writing Memoirs: One Story at a Time

Course Leader: Myrna Rybczyk

Course Length/Start: 10 weeks starting on March 3 (Class time from 9:30 AM to 11:15 AM)

Course Description:

Has a family member or friend ever said; "You should write down these stories. Your memories are so interesting, and you ought to share them!" An autobiography is writing about your life; a memoir is writing from your life. We all have stories to tell, but the hardest part seems to be getting started and in-class writing activities are helpful for that purpose. Writing from life can bring both tears of joy and sadness, puzzlement, resolve, and many other feelings as you touch upon significant memories. 

Using the concept of a “themed circle,” we will be able to craft the stories of your life in a short form. We focus on finding one's voice and will not be making suggestions relating to grammar or structure. We listen with acceptance, speak from experience, and maintain confidentiality as we read each other’s tales in a safe environment.  

In each class, stories will be read and open to comment if the writer wishes. There will be a ten-minute write period at the end of each session. Approximately 2-4 hours per week will be needed for writing.

Books and Other Resources:

William Zinsser, Writing About Yourself, Da Capo Press, 2004
John McFee, Draft #4, Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2017
Mary Karr, The Art of Memoir, Harper, Collins Books, 2015
 

Biography:

I graduated from New England Conservatory of Music with a Bachelor’s Degree in Music with a major in Music Therapy. I worked as a Visiting Therapist for four and one-half years at The McLean Hospital. During part of that time, I was Assistant Director of Orchard Home for Girls, a branch of New England Home for Little Wanderers.  I taught high school chorus and band at Monadnock Regional High School in NH, followed by four years at Medfield State Hospital, MA as Head Music Therapist. Since 1970, I have taught piano, guitar, and voice in my studio, the Millis Music Studio, in my hometown. I have been Director of Music at Church of Christ Congregational UCC in Millis from 2000 to now. I have taught this class five times for LLAIC, co-leading with Carole McNamee in the first three sessions. I also teach this class at Church of Christ UCC in Millis where we are into our fourth year of writing.

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1Tue-1D-5a: Looking Together at Mythmakers: Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington

Course Leader: Beth Sanders

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

According to Adam Gopnik, “Both Homer and Remington . . . have found a place in not only American Art, but in the history of Americana . . .. Their careers are entangled with each other and with commercial and ceremonial occasions in America.” Together we will explore the myths they created, Homer, as he painted the East Coast from Canada to Florida and the Caribbean, and Remington as he crafted the drama of the American West in sculpture and oil painting. Looking together we will share our observations as we compare their careers in print, in war, and romanticized images of 19th century America.
Close looking is the theme. We will use Project Zero’s Thinking Routines comparing and contrasting Homer and Remington.  The session will be in a seminar format. No reading or preparation required.

Books and Other Resources:

None

Biography:

I am a docent at the Portland Museum of Art and a guide at the museum’s Winslow Homer Studio at Prouts Neck as well as a Gallery Instructor at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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2Wed-2A-5a: Favorite American Artists
2Wed-2B-5b: Favorite American Artists

Course Leader: Judith Scott

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on March 3 (Class time from 11:30 AM to 1:15 PM)            
5 weeks starting on April 14 (Class time from 11:30 AM to 1:15 PM)   

Course Description:

In this five-week art history course, we will explore the life and works of five American artists. We will view and discuss the luminous paintings of George Caleb Bingham, the Missouri artist, soldier, and politician who depicted frontier life along the Missouri River. We will learn about Winslow Homer’s Civil War illustrations, enjoy his charming renderings of country life, and thrill to his dramatic marine paintings. We will delight in the virtuosity of John Singer Sargent, the most acclaimed society portraitist and genre painter of the early 20th century and see how Grant Wood’s depictions of small town and rural life gave the American public an idealized vision of itself during the Great Depression. We will analyze Edward Hopper’s thought-provoking pictures of human isolation within the modern city and admire his landscapes and coastal seascapes.

I will augment slide lectures about each artist with many class discussions. Before class each week, I will email suggested brief online readings on background topics, provide handouts, and send summaries for each class. Note that this class is scheduled for 1¾ hours rather than 1½ hours to allow for longer class discussions, when appropriate.

Preparation will take less than an hour each week.

Books and Other Resources:

Online readings and highlighted documents to be supplied as described above.

Biography:

I was a guide at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum for over thirteen years and am now a Guide Emeritus. I was a docent at Danforth Art Museum and School for fifteen years. I conducted numerous tours at both museums and taught a significant portion of the Danforth New Docent class. I have been an amateur painter and student of art history for most of my life.  Now I am a retired senior manager in the computer industry. This is my third LLAIC course.

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1Tue-1B-5b: Where has Privacy Gone and Why Is it Important for You?

Course Leader: Sandy Sherizen

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 13

Course Description:

Your privacy is at risk and you need to find out why that is and what to do about it. Technological advances have allowed government, corporations, criminals and other forces to seek to collect more and more information about us. And they have gathered much of this without our permission, knowledge or even concern about our well being.  

What are the various definitions of privacy?  Is privacy dead? We will discuss privacy in a number of settings including healthcare, financial, political, personal and governmental affairs. We will examine how technological advances such as Big Data and Artificial Intelligence have been used to create more invasive techniques. In addition, we will study how privacy-related laws have developed and whether they are able to meet the current privacy onslaught. After we study the major problems in keeping privacy alive, we will study various ways by which we can protect ourselves.   

Classes will be very interactive with a lively discussion expected.  Readings will be 1-2 hours a week.

Books and Other Resources:

I will prepare a list of articles for each of the sessions.  They may be emailed to the class and/or made available in Google Sites.  In addition to discussing these, we will hear various perspectives from leading authorities on YouTube and Ted Talks.

Biography:

I was trained as a sociologist, specialized on criminology issues, and became a computer security and privacy consultant, writer and lecturer. I have taught at various universities, have had various media engagements, led seminars, and given speeches in many domestic and international settings. As ex-president, I am active at Congregation Beth El in Sudbury.  Having flunked retirement, I have taught ESL to adult immigrants and now serve on a patient research ethics and safety board (IRB) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. At several lifelong learning programs, I have taught a variety of topics including crime and criminal justice, social deviance, the invisible form of manipulation and surviving the Inquisition as a Secret Jew/Crypto Jew.

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1Tue-1A-5a: Is Aging a Disease? Untangling the Relationship

Course Leader: Michael Singer

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on March 2

Course Description:

This course is based on the premise that aging is not a disease, but a natural phenomenon deeply rooted in evolution, developmental biology, and human variation. In contrast, the concept of disease is a cultural construction that has its own rapidly changing evolutionary trajectory and variations. In a series of five sessions based on my book Is Aging A Disease?, we will learn about the aging process through a comparative evolutionary lens using both human and non-human examples. We will then address the question: What is a disease? We will look at how different groups of humans have conceptualized disease beginning with Neanderthals and ending with Eastern and Western cultures. We will show how the emergence of many chronic, non-infectious diseases are related to cultural, technological, economic, and social innovations over the past 50-75 years. In sum, aging is a natural process and disease represents an extreme variation of that process. Hence, the “diseases” of aging cannot be cured and aging cannot be abolished.

This five-week course will consist of five lectures (about 45 minutes each) followed by discussion.  No outside preparation time is expected.

Books and Other Resources:

It is not necessary for participants to purchase the book.

Biography:

After I graduated from of the University of Toronto, School of Medicine in 1964. I did post-graduate work in Boston (Beth Israel Hospital) 1965-1970 and in Cambridge England 1970-1971. I then joined the Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 1971. Rising through the ranks, I became a full professor. I practiced Renal Medicine (nephrology) as well as doing research. After I retired from Queen’s University in 2003, I practiced general internal medicine in the community until 2019.  

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3Thu-1D-8a: Golda Meir, Extraordinaire  (Period 1)
3Thu-2A-8a
:
Golda Meir, Extraordinaire  (Period 2)

Course Leader: Marvin Snider

Course Length/Start: 8 weeks starting on March 4

Course Description:

The first female head of state in the Western world and one of the most influential women in modern history, Golda Meir was a member of the tiny coterie of founders of Israel, and its most tenacious international defender. Her uncompromising devotion to shaping and defending a Jewish homeland against dogged enemies and skittish allies stunned political contemporaries skeptical about the stamina of an elderly leader, and transformed Middle Eastern politics for decades to follow.

A blend of Emma Goldman and Martin Luther King Jr. in the guise of a cookie-serving grandmother, Meir was a tough-as-nails politician who issued the first prescient warnings about the rise of international terrorism, out-maneuvered Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger at their own game of realpolitik, and led Israel through a bloody war even as she eloquently pleaded for peace. A prodigious fundraiser and persuasive international voice, Golda carried the nation through its most perilous hours while she herself battled cancer.

We will review Meir's childhood in virulently anti-Semitic Russia and her family's subsequent relocation to the United States,  She carved a nation out of its own nightmares and dreams within the framework of the American immigrant experience, the Holocaust, and the single-mindedness of a generation, a legendary woman defined by contradictions: an iron resolve coupled with magnetic charm, an utter ordinariness of appearance matched to extraordinary achievements, a kindly demeanor that disguised a stunning hard-heartedness, and a complete dedication to her country that often overwhelmed her personal relationships.

Class discussion of readings with 2-3 hours preparation each week

Books and Other Resources:

Golda, by Elinor Burkett

Biography:

I have a PhD in psychology and have practiced both as a clinician and an organizational consultant. I have led many courses on diverse topics at the Harvard Life Learning Program and at LLAIC that included courses on International Hotspots, Innovators of Political Thought, Cults, presidents (most recently JFK, Truman, Johnson, Nixon, and others). These courses on founders and presidents emphasized understanding their personality and accomplishments, why they did what they did, and the impact their actions had on the country.

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2Wed-3A-5b: The LILAC Players  (No course fee)

Course Leader: Paula Silver and Roseli Weiss

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks starting on April 14

Course Description:

Broadway beckons!! Well, maybe not Broadway, but the Lilac Players need you! We will be meeting the last five weeks of the spring semester to rehearse the play(s) that will be chosen within the next few months. We will perform after the semester ends. Experience is not necessary; you just need to be a bit of a “ham” and have a desire for fun. We always enjoy reading, bonding, and emoting. 

Auditions will be held the first week. Please sign up as soon as possible, so that we know how many roles we’ll need to fill and which play to select. Because the entire production will be on Zoom, you will need to be able to use that platform, and we’re here to help you with the technology. You will need a tablet or PC/MAC. Remember: “All the world’s a stage”!

Classes will consist of reading and rehearsing each week. Student prep time will run from 45 minutes to an hour weekly.

Books and Other Resources:

Scripts to be made available.

Biography:

Paula Silver: My first introduction to theater was in the 6th grade, when I directed a student-written play. In high school and college, I performed in several productions, including the musicals Sayonara and Once Upon a Mattress. In later years I joined several little theater groups in San Francisco, most notably The Opera Ring, a theater in the round, where I performed as Ado Annie in Oklahoma, as well as Milk and Honey and The Three Penny Opera.

Roseli Weiss: I have been involved in theater since elementary school, and have been a member of several community groups, most recently The Spotlight Players in Westwood.  Presently I’m an actor and board member of We Did It for You, a musical tracing the history of women’s suffrage rights. This show, currently on Zoom, has played live throughout New England, including at Faneuil Hall. In addition, I am a guide on the Freedom Trail, working for The Boston Crier, DNA, and Intercruises, where I guide tourists on bus tours throughout Boston, Lexington, and Concord.

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1Tue-3C-5b: The Joy of Birding

Course Leader: Jeffrey Zupan

Course Length/Start: 5 weeks (with field trips) starting on April 13

Course Description:

If you’ve always wanted to be a bird-watcher (birder), now you have no excuse! This course will teach you how to identify the common birds in our area and give you tips for maximizing your chance of seeing them, what equipment to have, and which guide books and apps to use. We will go out in the field to see them, traveling nearby to three hotspots for birding.  The course will have two class sessions during LLAIC periods in April and then three field trips to meet the classes schedule in late April and early May. Class size limited to eight. Binoculars are required for the field trips.

Field trips will each require less than two miles of walking on ground that is fairly even.

Books and Other Resources:

Optional resources:
Peterson, Birds of the Eastern and Central North America, Houghton Mifflin, 2002
National Geographic, Field Guide to the Birds of North America
David Allen Sibley, The Sibley Guide to Birds, Alfred A. Knopf, 2000

Biography:

I have been a birder since 1958 and have traveled locally and beyond to see birds. There are over 10,500 species of birds in the world. I have seen only a mere 1,700 plus and counting, but have seen just about all those we can expect to see in eastern Massachusetts. Professionally, I am an urban transportation planner, 90% retired.

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Updated Feb. 10, 2021

Ċ
Peter Schmidt,
Jan 4, 2021, 9:28 AM
Ċ
Peter Schmidt,
Jan 4, 2021, 9:28 AM
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